Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/228480
Title: PLANNING THE COLONIAL CITY: GENDER AND THE SPATIAL PRESCRIPTIONS OF COMMERCE IN EARLY 20TH CENTURY HANOI AND SAIGON
Authors: CHARLOTTE BOULANGER
Issue Date: 30-Mar-2022
Citation: CHARLOTTE BOULANGER (2022-03-30). PLANNING THE COLONIAL CITY: GENDER AND THE SPATIAL PRESCRIPTIONS OF COMMERCE IN EARLY 20TH CENTURY HANOI AND SAIGON. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: This thesis explores the underlying spatial and gendered dimensions of organizing commerce in Hanoi and Saigon under the French colonial rule in the early twentieth century. Following contemporary trends in urban planning research, it suggests applying gender as a complementary lens to better understand colonial city planning in historical research. Through an analysis of both discourse and practice, this thesis focuses on the spatial and social organization of commerce in Hanoi and Saigon by plotting the evolution of the two cities against the background of a patriarchal and capitalist colonial project. It first argues that the two capital cities similarly expressed French power spatially not only through overt segregation along racial lines, but also through covert division of labour along gendered lines. As sites of experimentation, colonial cities were prime laboratories in which colonial prescriptions of modernization impacted to a greater extent the local social fabric and its patterns of urban organization. This thesis additionally addresses the commonplace dichotomous division of the two cities, in which Saigon embodies global commercial vibrancy and Hanoi typifies standard administrative concerns. By adopting a gendered framework of analysis, this research suggests that the fundamental patriarchal concerns of French colonial capitalist ideology heavily impacted the regulation and use of public and commercial spaces. Indeed, reappraising the influence of gender allows us to delve deeper into its impact on ideology and the sexual division of labour. Such a lens allows this thesis to argue that the commercial inclination of Saigon and internal competition for market shares was accompanied by more stringent and paternalistic spatial prescriptions that saw less opportunities for women’s involvement in commercial spaces. Conversely, despite operating under a similar creed of spatial exclusion, Hanoi proved to be more flexible and provided more covert opportunities for women’s involvement in both formal and informal commercial spheres.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/228480
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
CHARLOTTE BOULANGER.pdf7.1 MBAdobe PDF

RESTRICTED

NoneLog In

Page view(s)

41
checked on Feb 2, 2023

Download(s)

18
checked on Feb 2, 2023

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.