Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3758/s13423-017-1298-4
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dc.titleA dual memory theory of the testing effect
dc.contributor.authorRickard, Timothy C
dc.contributor.authorPan, Steven C
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-13T07:01:09Z
dc.date.available2022-07-13T07:01:09Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-01
dc.identifier.citationRickard, Timothy C, Pan, Steven C (2018-06-01). A dual memory theory of the testing effect. PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN & REVIEW 25 (3) : 847-869. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13423-017-1298-4
dc.identifier.issn10699384
dc.identifier.issn15315320
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/228399
dc.description.abstractA new theoretical framework for the testing effect—the finding that retrieval practice is usually more effective for learning than are other strategies—is proposed, the empirically supported tenet of which is that separate memories form as a consequence of study and test events. A simplest case quantitative model is derived from that framework for the case of cued recall. With no free parameters, that model predicts both proportion correct in the test condition and the magnitude of the testing effect across 10 experiments conducted in our laboratory, experiments that varied with respect to material type, retention interval, and performance in the restudy condition. The model also provides the first quantitative accounts of (a) the testing effect as a function of performance in the restudy condition, (b) the upper bound magnitude of the testing effect, (c) the effect of correct answer feedback, (d) the testing effect as a function of retention interval for the cases of feedback and no feedback, and (e) the effect of prior learning method on subsequent learning through testing. Candidate accounts of several other core phenomena in the literature, including test-potentiated learning, recognition versus cued recall training effects, cued versus free recall final test effects, and other select transfer effects, are also proposed. Future prospects and relations to other theories are discussed.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSPRINGER
dc.sourceElements
dc.subjectSocial Sciences
dc.subjectPsychology, Mathematical
dc.subjectPsychology, Experimental
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectRetrieval practice
dc.subjectTesting effect
dc.subjectTest-enhanced learning
dc.subjectMemory
dc.subjectQuantitative model
dc.subjectRETRIEVAL PRACTICE
dc.subjectNAME GAME
dc.subjectCLINICAL-APPLICATION
dc.subjectRETENTION INTERVAL
dc.subjectENHANCE RETENTION
dc.subjectIMPROVES MEMORY
dc.subjectCUED-RECALL
dc.subjectPOWER-LAW
dc.subjectBENEFIT
dc.subjectRECOGNITION
dc.typeReview
dc.date.updated2022-07-11T07:27:05Z
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF PSYCHOLOGY
dc.description.doi10.3758/s13423-017-1298-4
dc.description.sourcetitlePSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN & REVIEW
dc.description.volume25
dc.description.issue3
dc.description.page847-869
dc.published.statePublished
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