Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1037/xlm0001090
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dc.titleSevere Publication Bias Contributes to Illusory Sleep Consolidation in the Motor Sequence Learning Literature
dc.contributor.authorRickard, Timothy C
dc.contributor.authorPan, Steven C
dc.contributor.authorGupta, Mohan W
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-13T01:51:29Z
dc.date.available2022-07-13T01:51:29Z
dc.date.issued2022-01-27
dc.identifier.citationRickard, Timothy C, Pan, Steven C, Gupta, Mohan W (2022-01-27). Severe Publication Bias Contributes to Illusory Sleep Consolidation in the Motor Sequence Learning Literature. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1037/xlm0001090
dc.identifier.issn02787393
dc.identifier.issn19391285
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/228341
dc.description.abstractWe explored the possibility of publication bias in the sleep and explicit motor sequence learning literature by applying precision effect test (PET) and precision effect test with standard errors (PEESE) weighted regression analyses to the 88 effect sizes from. recent comprehensive literature review (Pan & Rickard, 2015). Basic PET analysis indicated pronounced publication bias; that is, the effect sizes were strongly predicted by their standard error. When variables that have previously been shown to both moderate the sleep gain effect and substantially reduce unaccounted for effect size heterogeneity were included in that analysis, evidence for publication bias remained strong. The estimated postsleep gain was negative, suggesting forgetting rather than facilitation, and it was statistically indistinguishable from the estimated postwake gain. In. qualitative review of. smaller group of more recent studies we observed that (a) small sample sizes—a major factor behind the publication bias—are still the norm, (b) use of demonstrably flawed experimental design and analysis remains prevalent, and (c) when authors conclude in favor of sleep-dependent consolidation, they frequently do not cite the articles in which those methodological flaws have been demonstrated. We conclude that there is substantial publication bias, that there is no consolidation-based, absolute performance gain following sleep, and that strong conclusions regarding the hypothesis of less forgetting after sleep than after wakefulness should await further research. Recommendations are made for reducing publication bias in future work.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAMER PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC
dc.sourceElements
dc.subjectSocial Sciences
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectPsychology, Experimental
dc.subjectpublication bias
dc.subjectsleep
dc.subjectmotor sequence learning
dc.subjectfinger-tapping
dc.subjectfinger-thumb
dc.subjectMEMORY CONSOLIDATION
dc.subjectDEPENDENT CONSOLIDATION
dc.subjectTIME-COURSE
dc.subjectON-TASK
dc.subjectSKILL
dc.subjectPERFORMANCE
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-07-11T07:16:08Z
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF PSYCHOLOGY
dc.description.doi10.1037/xlm0001090
dc.description.sourcetitleJOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION
dc.published.statePublished
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