Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/227306
Title: EFFECTIVENESS OF ENGAGEMENT IN SELF-CARE PROGRAMMES IN ENHANCING MENTAL WELLBEING: INTELLECT – AN EXPERIMENTAL FOLLOW-UP STUDY
Authors: VANESSA TAN SING YEE
Issue Date: 8-Apr-2022
Citation: VANESSA TAN SING YEE (2022-04-08). EFFECTIVENESS OF ENGAGEMENT IN SELF-CARE PROGRAMMES IN ENHANCING MENTAL WELLBEING: INTELLECT – AN EXPERIMENTAL FOLLOW-UP STUDY. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Anxiety and depression are significant predictors of mental wellbeing (MW). Studies on uses of self-care apps (SCApps) and improvements in MW revealed mixed findings (Bidargaddi et al., 2017; Kajitani et al., 2020). However, there is scant research on psychological mindedness (PM) as a moderator in the MW outcomes, which could influence SCApps’ effectiveness. This study thus investigated the effectiveness of Intellect’s mental wellbeing programme (MWP) in improving MW outcomes, and explored PM as a moderator on the hypothesised effects of MWP targeted at enhancing MW. This randomised controlled trial compared the effectiveness of MWP to an active control condition (productivity programme), among university students (N=174). Participants completed baseline assessments measuring anxiety, depression and PM, and were randomised to one of the two conditions where they downloaded and utilised their allocated programmes for 14 days. Participants were measured on the outcomes immediately after completing the programmes, and again 14 days post-intervention. Both conditions experienced decreases in depression and anxiety from pre- to post-intervention and follow-up. Enhanced MW across both conditions were maintained during follow-up. Moderation analyses found no support for PM as a moderator in the intervention condition. The theoretical and practical implications, limitations and future directions were also discussed.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/227306
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
2120_HT_VanessaTanSingYee.pdf1.04 MBAdobe PDF

RESTRICTED

NoneLog In

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.