Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13113803
Title: Family Socioecological Correlates of Lifestyle Patterns in Early Childhood: A Cross-Sectional Study from the EDEN Mother-Child Cohort
Authors: Descarpentrie, Alexandra
Saldanha-Gomes, Cecilia
Guivarch, Claire
Dargent-Molina, Patricia
de Lauzon-Guillain, Blandine
Plancoulaine, Sabine
Charles, Marie-Aline
Chia, Airu 
Chong, Mary Foong Fong 
Vandentorren, Stephanie
Heude, Barbara
Bernard, Jonathan Yoan
Lioret, Sandrine
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
children
energy balance-related behaviors
lifestyle patterns
socioecological model
family
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
SEDENTARY BEHAVIOR
SLEEP DURATION
OBESITY
ASSOCIATIONS
WEIGHT
OVERWEIGHT
EDUCATION
FATHERS
CONTEXT
Issue Date: 1-Nov-2021
Publisher: MDPI
Citation: Descarpentrie, Alexandra, Saldanha-Gomes, Cecilia, Guivarch, Claire, Dargent-Molina, Patricia, de Lauzon-Guillain, Blandine, Plancoulaine, Sabine, Charles, Marie-Aline, Chia, Airu, Chong, Mary Foong Fong, Vandentorren, Stephanie, Heude, Barbara, Bernard, Jonathan Yoan, Lioret, Sandrine (2021-11-01). Family Socioecological Correlates of Lifestyle Patterns in Early Childhood: A Cross-Sectional Study from the EDEN Mother-Child Cohort. NUTRIENTS 13 (11). ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13113803
Abstract: Energy balance-related behaviors (EBRBs), i.e., diet, sedentary behavior, physical activity, and sleep, combine into lifestyle patterns, which we aim to identify in French preschoolers and analyze their family correlates within the framework of a comprehensive socioecological model. Parental questionnaires provided information about family characteristics and children’s EBRBs for 978 5-year-olds of the EDEN cohort. We used principal component analysis to derive lifestyle patterns from EBRBs and hierarchical multivariable linear regressions to assess their associations with family socio-demographics, parent health/behaviors, and parent-child interactions. Analyses were stratified by sex. Of the three lifestyle patterns identified (unhealthy, healthy, and mixed), the mixed pattern differed the most between sexes. Lower parental education, suboptimal maternal diet, TV during meals, and later bedtime were associated with higher adherence to unhealthy patterns. Children cognitively stimulated at home and boys of mothers not employed adhered more to the healthy pattern. Older siblings (for girls) and higher engagement of parents in leisure-time physical activity (for boys) were related to greater adherence to mixed patterns. The identification of various correlates from multiple socioecological levels suggests that tackling the potentially synergistic effect of lifestyle patterns on health requires addressing processes relevant to the parent-child dimension and structural barriers parents may encounter.
Source Title: NUTRIENTS
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/227039
ISSN: 20726643
DOI: 10.3390/nu13113803
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