Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13142-017-0499-8
Title: Engagement, compliance and retention with a gamified online social networking physical activity intervention
Authors: Ryan, J
Edney, S 
Maher, C
Keywords: Engagement
Facebook
Gamification
Health behaviour interventions
Online social networks
Physical activity
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Electronic Mail
Exercise
Female
Health Promotion
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance
Patient Participation
Reminder Systems
Sex Factors
Social Media
Social Networking
Time Factors
Video Games
Young Adult
Issue Date: 1-Dec-2017
Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)
Citation: Ryan, J, Edney, S, Maher, C (2017-12-01). Engagement, compliance and retention with a gamified online social networking physical activity intervention. Translational Behavioral Medicine 7 (4) : 702-708. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13142-017-0499-8
Abstract: Health behaviour interventions delivered via online social networks are an increasingly popular approach to addressing lifestyle-related health problems. However, research to date consistently reports poor user engagement and retention. The current study examined user engagement, compliance and retention with Active Team—a gamified physical activity intervention delivered by via an online Facebook application. Associations between engagement and participant (n = 51) demographic and team characteristics (sex, age, education and team size) were examined, as well as temporal trends in engagement during the 50-day intervention. Analyses revealed significant associations between both engagement (p = <0.001) and gamification (p = 0.04) with education, with participants in the middle education category appearing to have the highest rates of engagement and use of gamification features. Gender was also related to engagement, with males demonstrating the highest use of the intervention’s gamification features (p = 0.004). Although compliance was consistently high for the duration, engagement declined steadily throughout the intervention. Engagement peaked on Wednesdays, coinciding with the delivery of a customised email reminder. Findings reveal individual differences in engagement with Active Team, highlighting a need to tailor interventions to the target audience. Gamification features may enhance engagement amongst males, who are traditionally recognised as a difficult demographic group to engage. Finally, the use of customised, periodic push reminders delivered by email may enhance user engagement by drawing them back to the intervention and helping to sustain intervention behaviours.
Source Title: Translational Behavioral Medicine
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/226767
ISSN: 18696716
16139860
DOI: 10.1007/s13142-017-0499-8
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