Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-020-10100-0
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dc.titleExamining social-cognitive theory constructs as mediators of behaviour change in the active team smartphone physical activity program: a mediation analysis
dc.contributor.authorRomeo, AV
dc.contributor.authorEdney, SM
dc.contributor.authorPlotnikoff, RC
dc.contributor.authorOlds, T
dc.contributor.authorVandelanotte, C
dc.contributor.authorRyan, J
dc.contributor.authorCurtis, R
dc.contributor.authorMaher, CA
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-08T01:36:21Z
dc.date.available2022-06-08T01:36:21Z
dc.date.issued2021-12-01
dc.identifier.citationRomeo, AV, Edney, SM, Plotnikoff, RC, Olds, T, Vandelanotte, C, Ryan, J, Curtis, R, Maher, CA (2021-12-01). Examining social-cognitive theory constructs as mediators of behaviour change in the active team smartphone physical activity program: a mediation analysis. BMC Public Health 21 (1) : 88-. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-020-10100-0
dc.identifier.issn14712458
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/226685
dc.description.abstractBackground: Regular engagement in physical activity has well-established physical and psychological health benefits. Despite this, over a quarter of the global adult population is insufficiently physically active. Physical activity interventions grounded in behaviour change theory, such as the social-cognitive theory, are widely considered to be more effective than non-theoretical approaches. Such interventions set out to intervene on the ultimate outcome (physical activity), but also influence intermediate factors (social-cognitive theory constructs) which in turn, are believed to influence physical activity behaviour. The primary aim of the study was to use mediation analysis to examine whether changes in the social-cognitive theory and related constructs, in particular self-efficacy, outcome expectations, intentions, barriers and goal setting, mediated the effects of a smartphone-based social networking physical activity intervention. Methods: Mediation analyses were conducted using the PROCESS Macro in SPSS to (i) calculate the regression coefficients for the effect of the independent variable (group allocation) on the hypothesised mediators (social-cognitive theory constructs), (ii) calculate the regression coefficient for the effect of the hypothesised mediators (social-cognitive theory constructs) on the dependent variable (objectively measured physical activity or self-report physical activity), independent of group assignment and (iii) determine the total, direct and indirect intervention effects. Results: Data from 243 participants were included in the mediation analysis. There was no evidence of mediation for change in objectively measured MVPA or self-reported MVPA. Conclusions: There was no conclusive evidence that any of the social-cognitive theory constructs mediated the relationship between an app-based intervention and change in physical activity. Ongoing efforts to develop and understand components that make physical activity app-based interventions effective are recommended. Trial registration: This trial was registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (ACTRN12617000113358, date of registration 23 January, 2017).
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.sourceElements
dc.subjectApp
dc.subjectBehaviour change
dc.subjectHealth behaviour
dc.subjectIntervention
dc.subjectMediation analysis
dc.subjectMediators
dc.subjectPhysical activity
dc.subjectSelf-efficacy
dc.subjectSmartphone
dc.subjectSocial-cognitive theory
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAustralia
dc.subjectCognition
dc.subjectExercise
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMediation Analysis
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjectSmartphone
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-06-07T05:20:16Z
dc.contributor.departmentSAW SWEE HOCK SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
dc.description.doi10.1186/s12889-020-10100-0
dc.description.sourcetitleBMC Public Health
dc.description.volume21
dc.description.issue1
dc.description.page88-
dc.published.statePublished
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