Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1080/15502783.2022.2057196
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dc.titleCultural differences in hydration practices among physically active individuals: a narrative review
dc.contributor.authorLeow, Clarence Hong Wei
dc.contributor.authorTan, Beverly
dc.contributor.authorMiyashita, Masashi
dc.contributor.authorLee, Jason Kai Wei
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-17T03:26:00Z
dc.date.available2022-05-17T03:26:00Z
dc.date.issued2022-12-31
dc.identifier.citationLeow, Clarence Hong Wei, Tan, Beverly, Miyashita, Masashi, Lee, Jason Kai Wei (2022-12-31). Cultural differences in hydration practices among physically active individuals: a narrative review. JOURNAL OF THE INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY OF SPORTS NUTRITION 19 (1) : 150-163. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1080/15502783.2022.2057196
dc.identifier.issn1550-2783
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/225536
dc.description.abstractIt is well-established that appropriate hydration practices are essential in promoting health and optimizing performance and recovery. However, evidence-based hydration guidelines may not be adopted due to cultural differences across countries, such as religious beliefs, traditions, preferences, and beverage availability. Examples of hydration practices influenced by culture include beer consumption after sports in Western countries, consumption of sugarcane juice in India and Ramadan fasting among Muslims. For most cultural hydration practices, there is limited scientific evidence on their effects on rehydration, exercise performance, and recovery. Despite possible benefits of various hydration practices on exercise performance and recovery, they are inconsistent with current evidence-based hydration recommendations. More research on the impacts of cultural hydration differences on physiology, performance, and recovery is warranted to allow evidence-based guidelines and advisories. Abbreviations: ABV: alcohol by volume, ACSM: American College of Sports Medicine, NATA: National Athletic Trainers’ Association, ROS: reactive oxygen species, TCM: Traditional Chinese Medicine.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTAYLOR & FRANCIS INC
dc.sourceElements
dc.subjectScience & Technology
dc.subjectLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subjectNutrition & Dietetics
dc.subjectSport Sciences
dc.subjectCulture
dc.subjectsports nutrition
dc.subjecthydration status
dc.subjectexercise performance
dc.subjectexercise recovery
dc.subjectEUTERPE-OLERACEA-MART.
dc.subjectRAMADAN OBSERVANCE
dc.subjectALCOHOL
dc.subjectJUICE
dc.subjectPERFORMANCE
dc.subjectABSORPTION
dc.subjectCAPACITY
dc.subjectFRUCTOSE
dc.subjectBERRY
dc.typeReview
dc.date.updated2022-05-14T14:57:44Z
dc.contributor.departmentDEAN'S OFFICE (MEDICINE)
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF PHYSIOLOGY
dc.description.doi10.1080/15502783.2022.2057196
dc.description.sourcetitleJOURNAL OF THE INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY OF SPORTS NUTRITION
dc.description.volume19
dc.description.issue1
dc.description.page150-163
dc.published.stateAccepted
dc.description.redepositcompleted
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