Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/223846
Title: FUTURE-READY GRADUATES FOR INDUSTRY 4.0: TRANSFORMATIONS OF MINDSETS AND COMPETENCIES OF THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY
Authors: NG WAN LENG EILEEN
Keywords: Building
PFM
Project and Facilities Management
Low Sui Pheng
2017/2018 PFM
Employability
Industry 4.0
Construction industry
Soft skills
SERVQUAL model
USEM model of employability
Theory of Planned Behaviour
Issue Date: 6-Jun-2018
Citation: NG WAN LENG EILEEN (2018-06-06). FUTURE-READY GRADUATES FOR INDUSTRY 4.0: TRANSFORMATIONS OF MINDSETS AND COMPETENCIES OF THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The disparity due to the expectations of employers and the ability of future graduates to meet these expectations is an issue for employment. Industry 4.0, categorised by technologies such as big data and automation, permeate the construction industry, exacerbating the rift that future graduates have to bridge due to changing expectations. With sophisticated forms of technology emerging, the ways individuals work and communicate are expected to change as well. Soft skills are thus needed to support, materialise and enhance one’s existing technical skills. This study aims to explore the impact that Industry 4.0 has on employability in the local construction industry from the viewpoints of employers’ and future graduates’ from the B.Sc. (Project and Facilities Management) or PFM programme. An adapted framework from the SERVQUAL model, USEM employability model and concepts from the Theory of Planned Behaviour is used. Nine essential soft skills for Industry 4.0 were identified by the Centre of Future-Ready Graduates and were used to craft the survey. Gap and ttest analyses based on the survey results concluded six significant divides amongst the nine soft skills — Resilience, Curiosity, Adaptability, Entrepreneurial Thinking, Pursuing Convictions and Vision — showing a significant difference between the mean expectations of employers and soft skills capabilities of PFM students. Hence, PFM students are found to lack the appropriate soft skills for Industry 4.0. Drivers, barriers and solutions to improve the soft skills divides were explored through interview sessions with future graduates. Four parties — the government, educational institutions, the industry and individuals — were identified as crucial members of change. From the interviews, policies should take into account soft skills development. Courses and grants should be introduced. Educational institutions can introduce mentoring programmes, actively promote CFG’s workshops, alter the teaching methods of professors and create opportunities for students to improve their soft skills. Moreover, the construction industry should nurture a supportive working environment and provide training courses. Lastly, individuals should proactively enhance their soft skills and cultivate their interests from young.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/223846
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
Ng Wan Leng Eileen 2017-2018.pdf4.05 MBAdobe PDF

RESTRICTED

NoneLog In

Page view(s)

17
checked on Sep 22, 2022

Download(s)

14
checked on Sep 22, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.