Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/223678
Title: COUNTER MEMORY AND THE POST HUMANIST SUBJECT: (ANTI-) REPRESENTATION OF THE FUKUSHIMA GATE VILLAGE
Authors: TAN WEN JUN
Keywords: Architecture
Design Track
DT
Master (Architecture)
Tsuto Sakamoto
2015/2016 Aki DT
Anti-memorial
Dark Tourism
Database Consumption
Deliberate Democracy
General Will
Posthumanism
Unconscious Democracy
Issue Date: 7-Jan-2016
Citation: TAN WEN JUN (2016-01-07). COUNTER MEMORY AND THE POST HUMANIST SUBJECT: (ANTI-) REPRESENTATION OF THE FUKUSHIMA GATE VILLAGE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: In 2013, Hiroki Azuma led a group of thinkers, artists, architects and scholars to come up with “The Fukuichi Kanko Project” in an attempt to “tourize” Fukushima, a term used to signify the categorical disclosure of information to the general public. It is a proposal to draw tourists to the site of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident by 2036, 25 years after the nuclear disaster, to keep the memory of the accident alive. The project advocates ongoing debates, information updates and constant renewal of memory so that the public memory does not become one that is controlled by a single subject which may not be close to the truth and easily manipulated to fit one single subject’s interpretation. A single narrative is also taken to be too convenient, thus promoting a negligent and uncritical attitude towards public memory. Identifying that the traditional relationship between subject and object starts to become problematic, I adopt Hays’ definition for my own studies on the emergence of posthumanism within the Fukushima Gate Village, in which Hays defines posthumanism as “the conscious response to the dissolution of psychological autonomy and individualism.” The posthumanist notion to counter monumentalism displaces the humanist subject as the source of meaning and constitutes it within a bigger picture of changing contexts and socio-cultural practices. In the context of the Fukushima Gate Village, I conjecture that Azuma intends the tourists to become ‘sample subjects’ who collectively form an unconscious database where they actively interpret, tweet, record and spread narratives on the accident site. This reinforces Azuma’s idea that it is essential to report the true story and aftermath of the nuclear accident which could only be possible through the “perspectives of the common folks’ understanding instead of that of a researcher or a journalist.” Yet, whereas the unconscious database can negate the subject, the basis of architecture is a conscious action. Therefore, a deeper probe in the idea of posthuman anti-monument reveals a limitation to the unconscious database as a mean to resist representation. Can it really symbolize nothing such that multiple narratives and interpretations can emerge?
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/223678
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