Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/223614
Title: ABSOLUTE, RELATIVE AND RELATIONAL SPACE OF THE HDB GROUND PLANE: AN ANALYTICAL STUDY OF PATTERNS AND PREJUDICE AMONGST THE RESIDENT AND THE NON-RESIDENT
Authors: CHENG YU-QI LYNN
Keywords: Architecture
Design Track
DT
Master (Architecture)
Junko Tamura
2015/2016 Aki DT
Issue Date: 14-Dec-2015
Citation: CHENG YU-QI LYNN (2015-12-14). ABSOLUTE, RELATIVE AND RELATIONAL SPACE OF THE HDB GROUND PLANE: AN ANALYTICAL STUDY OF PATTERNS AND PREJUDICE AMONGST THE RESIDENT AND THE NON-RESIDENT. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The definition of public space has always been a contested one. With the absolute definition as a space made for any member of the public to use but in reality, there are unspoken restrictions on certain behaviours and even on those who are welcome into the space. These little contradictions give rise to a space of a highly paradoxical nature with ethical conflicts. ‘Rightful’ users of the space challenge those who do not belong to the space and these two groups become estranged over space and time. Ultimately, this will breed feelings of animosity and prejudice against those who do not ‘rightfully belong’. This phenomenon is felt at the HDB ground floor with the conflicting parties being residents and non-residents. This dissertation defines residents to be the inhabitants of the HDB neighbourhood while non-residents as a broad term encompassing all individuals who are not inhabitants, with a particular emphasis on migrant workers. With the HDB ground floor as a ubiquitous element in daily Singaporean life, unbeknownst to the individual it has the potential to play a significant role in shaping his perceptions on xenophobia. The current relationship between resident and non-resident is not belligerent but if left to fester, accompanied by the steady rise in migrant workers, this is an imminent future. This dissertation hypothesizes that within the HDB ground plane there are visible patterns of conflict between residents and non-residents that stem from both existent prejudice and prejudice inculcated by spatial features. The animosity will be studied using David Harvey’s concepts of absolute, relative and relational space. It is hypothesized that residents will use absolute or legitimate spaces more while non-residents are less inclined. Furthermore, the actions of each group will implicate the other and this will be looked at through relative and relational space. This dissertation wishes to study the actions of residents and nonresidents for the proposal of a final rule to aid in the more friendly design of the HDB ground plane, one that may replace conflict with the intended purpose of public space; one that is meant for all to use and enjoy.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/223614
Appears in Collections:Master's Theses (Restricted)

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