Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/223516
Title: WILD NEIGHBOURS: IMAGINING TRANS-SPECIES EDGES IN URBAN SINGAPORE
Authors: KIRK YILING
Keywords: 2020-2021
Architecture
Master's
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE
Nirmal Kishnani
Design Thesis
Design Track
DT
Issue Date: 12-Jul-2021
Citation: KIRK YILING (2021-07-12). WILD NEIGHBOURS: IMAGINING TRANS-SPECIES EDGES IN URBAN SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The city is represented as de-wilded and re-ordered spaces where savage wilderness is bulldozed over and transformed into ‘cultured’ landscapes. This ingrained concept of civility is articulated in the spatial logic of cities. The practice of spatial ordering delineates spurious territorial boundaries, distancing man from the untamed. This containerization of nature and city illustrates a dualistic quality of spaces where an exclusively urban landscape sits on one side and a ‘wild’ nature reserve on the other. Viewed from above, this demarcation attempts to narrate with clear certainty a cartographic opposite between the city and the wild. With its defining segregation, the human-wildlife relationship is therein perpetuated by the construct of socio-spatial belonging. Yet, this paradigm of human-wildlife spatial categorization suggests an oversimplified classification and two-dimensional understanding of life forms. Overcoming ecological barriers, synanthropic species triumphed over the prescribed urban grid, spilling over to the everyday anthropogenic spaces. Against the geographical and ideological boundaries, these movements against the grain of urban design are interpreted as the transgressions of species boundaries. The presence of wildlife in anthropogenic environments is thus perceived to be ‘out-of-place’ and ‘de-civilized’, contributing to urban moral decay. With the city’s taxonomic absolutism in spatial design, the transboundary movement of animals has inevitably escalated human-wildlife intolerance and conflict. In various instances, this has provided legitimate grounds for wildlife extermination - an undoubtedly ruthless irony to the quest for conservation. Wild Neighbours challenges this spatial fetishism through its adoption of reconciliation ecology. It visualizes human-wildlife cohabitation with its privately-owned wildlife habitat where green nodes and networks are allocated and intertwines within anthropogenic spaces. Concurrently, the architecture responds by envisioning a trans-species facade system through the integration of habitat niches along its facade. The newfound development therein incites the new vision of trans-species conviviality spaces that seeks to unfetter the socio-spatial biases in planning.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/223516
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