Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/223470
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dc.titleMACHINE DEVELOPMENT IN DIGITAL FABRICATION AND ITS INFLUENCE ON BUILDING DESIGN
dc.contributor.authorKAN LIJING
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-22T03:47:03Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-22T20:34:08Z
dc.date.available2019-09-26T14:14:11Z
dc.date.available2022-04-22T20:34:08Z
dc.date.issued2013-11-22
dc.identifier.citationKAN LIJING (2013-11-22). MACHINE DEVELOPMENT IN DIGITAL FABRICATION AND ITS INFLUENCE ON BUILDING DESIGN. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/223470
dc.description.abstractIntroduction of Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machines and Computer Aided Design (CAD) software to architectural profession at the end of the last century has freed architecture practice from standardized production. Algorithm lends itself to architects so that architects can shift their focus from explicit, platonic, and primitive shapes to implicit abstraction of logical principles governing overall design. The outcomes, in most cases, are complex in formal properties and behaviours. Through use of digital fabrication, architects possess a direct access to the tools and techniques used in the manufacturing of building components, enabling them to express complex design forms more precisely. While conventional CNC machines are task specific and material specific, the use of universal industrial robot is more adaptable to various fabrication tasks. This adaptation is achieved through modifying robot’s end effector, changing the interface between machine and material. Besides processing components, an industrial robot can perform simple assembly tasks. Thus, industrial robots’ applications comply with design complexity. Coupling CNC machines with industrial robots is a step closer to integrating fabrication with design, in which the design product genuinely reflects an architect’s intention. While detailing in the modern context addresses the negotiation between design and standard components, detailing in the digital era addresses negotiation between non-standard components and organization of material information. The integration of design concept, material properties, methods of production and the assembly process into a flow of consistent logical principles, allows each operation to follow a cycle of feedback. Thus, this paper hypothesizes that machine development favours higher efficiency, complexity resolution, and incorporation of material properties in the digital age. Through investigating a series of case studies, the research examines two commonly used machines for digital fabrication, i.e. CNC machine and industrial robot, and questions if industrial robots are indeed more applicable in the integration of design, fabrication and construction processes.
dc.language.isoen
dc.sourcehttps://lib.sde.nus.edu.sg/dspace/handle/sde/2464
dc.subjectArchitecture
dc.subjectDesign Technology and Sustainability
dc.subjectDTS
dc.subjectMaster
dc.subjectMichael Budig
dc.subject2013/2014 Aki DTS
dc.subjectCNC machine
dc.subjectDigital fabrication
dc.subjectIntegration of process
dc.subjectMass customization
dc.subjectNon-standard components
dc.subjectRobotic fabrication
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.departmentARCHITECTURE
dc.contributor.supervisorMICHAEL BUDIG
dc.description.degreeMaster's
dc.description.degreeconferredMASTER OF ARCHITECTURE (M.ARCH)
dc.embargo.terms2013-12-26
Appears in Collections:Master's Theses (Restricted)

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