Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/223368
DC FieldValue
dc.titleDISCRIMINATION IN SINGAPORE'S RESIDENTIAL RENTAL MARKET
dc.contributor.authorPANG, YU YUN
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-14T02:20:43Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-22T20:31:36Z
dc.date.available2019-09-26T14:14:10Z
dc.date.available2022-04-22T20:31:36Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-14
dc.identifier.citationPANG, YU YUN (2019-05-14). DISCRIMINATION IN SINGAPORE'S RESIDENTIAL RENTAL MARKET. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/223368
dc.description.abstractThis paper studies explicit discrimination in Singapore’s residential rental market. The study was conducted using rental listings from property listing website, 99.co. It contributes to the existing literature as it deviates from conventional field experiments that were used to detect discrimination in various consumer markets, especially the housing market. In particular, the objectives of this study are to investigate the impact of indicating “All Races Welcome” in a property listing on rental prices, and the extent of the impact across planning regions and property types. In addition, the characteristics of landlords were also studied to examine the extent of impact on rental prices. This paper hopes to shed some light on discriminatory behaviour in Singapore’s residential rental market, given that Singapore is a multicultural country, and harmony between races, ethnic groups and nationalities is crucial in ensuring Singapore’s economic and social development. The first section of the research is conducted with descriptive statistics. Following on, a hedonic regression was used to determine the impact of indicating “All Races Welcome” on rental prices. The findings revealed that landlords who welcome all races would demand a higher rental as compared to landlords who do not welcome all races. This result is constant across planning regions and property types. Furthermore, this paper has also found that the premium is larger if the rental unit is owned by a Non-Chinese landlord. Landlords who are staying in the units together with the tenants will also command a higher premium as compared to units without landlords staying in. The presence of such premium suggests underlying discrimination behaviour during tenant selection process. Discriminatory behaviour should be addressed as it may affect the harmony between diverse communities.
dc.language.isoen
dc.sourcehttps://lib.sde.nus.edu.sg/dspace/handle/sde/4464
dc.subjectReal Estate
dc.subjectQin Yu
dc.subjectRE
dc.subject2018-2019 RE
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.departmentREAL ESTATE
dc.contributor.supervisorQIN YU
dc.description.degreeBachelor's
dc.description.degreeconferredBACHELOR OF SCIENCE (REAL ESTATE)
dc.embargo.terms2019-06-04
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

Show simple item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
Pang Yu Yun 2018-2019.pdf457.04 kBAdobe PDF

RESTRICTED

NoneLog In

Page view(s)

40
checked on Nov 17, 2022

Download(s)

13
checked on Nov 17, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.