Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/223344
DC FieldValue
dc.titleA SWOT ANALYSIS ON PREFABRICATION SPECIALISTS IN SINGAPORE
dc.contributor.authorCHIA RONG JIE, JONATHAN
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-04T08:54:51Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-22T20:30:58Z
dc.date.available2019-09-26T14:14:10Z
dc.date.available2022-04-22T20:30:58Z
dc.date.issued2018-12-04
dc.identifier.citationCHIA RONG JIE, JONATHAN (2018-12-04). A SWOT ANALYSIS ON PREFABRICATION SPECIALISTS IN SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/223344
dc.description.abstractPrefabrication technology, such as Design for Manufacturing and Assembly (DfMA) has been identified as an option to improving construction productivity and competitiveness in the local construction industry. In face of the changing local construction landscape, the strategic study on the current situation and planning measures for prefabrication specialists are limited. Hence, the study undertakes a Strength, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) analysis of prefabrication specialists and provides recommendations on how opportunities and threats can be overcome in the local construction industry. Data were collected from 39 survey questionnaires with local construction professionals such as developers, contractors, consultants and suppliers of prefabricated components. Comparisons made between prefabricated and traditional cast in-situ components found that utilisation of prefabricated components over traditional cast in-situ methodology enjoy time savings of 7.8% and significantly higher quality finish albeit at an increased cost of 12.2%. The strengths of prefabrication specialists are high production efficiency, short lead time required to provide components and having a strong production track record. The weaknesses are the lack of site and delivery management and the high cost in production of prefabricated components. The opportunities are evident from the government initiatives such as the restriction of foreign labour, drivers for prefabrication technology, initiatives for a productive industry and project specific initiatives. The threats to prefabrication specialists include competition from overseas prefabricators, challenges in securing funding and unfavourable market conditions that disrupt the production process. In order for prefabrication specialists to flourish in the competitive market, it is recommended that the production capability be streamlined through means such as lean philosophy and automation. Partnership with suppliers and transport firms should also be developed to guard against price fluctuations and inaccurate deliveries. Government support in the form of incentives and development of a labour force would aide prefabrication specialists in overcoming their threats and challenges.
dc.language.isoen
dc.sourcehttps://lib.sde.nus.edu.sg/dspace/handle/sde/4368
dc.subjectBuilding
dc.subjectPFM
dc.subjectProject and Facilities Management
dc.subjectLing Yean Yng Florence
dc.subject2018/2019 PFM
dc.subjectDfMA
dc.subjectPrefabrication
dc.subjectSingapore
dc.subjectSWOT Analysis
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.departmentBUILDING
dc.contributor.supervisorLING YEAN YNG FLORENCE
dc.description.degreeBachelor's
dc.description.degreeconferredBACHELOR OF SCIENCE (PROJECT AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT)
dc.embargo.terms2019-01-07
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

Show simple item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
Chia Rong Jie Jonathan 2018-2019.pdf2 MBAdobe PDF

RESTRICTED

NoneLog In

Page view(s)

47
checked on Dec 1, 2022

Download(s)

24
checked on Dec 1, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.