Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/223181
Title: GREEN MARK GRADING AND OCCUPANT �S MENTAL HEALTH: A STUDY ON SINGAPORE �S OFFICE BUILDINGS
Authors: LIM HWEE ZHI
Keywords: Huang Wei
Real Estate
RE
2019-2020 RE
Issue Date: 20-May-2020
Citation: LIM HWEE ZHI (2020-05-20). GREEN MARK GRADING AND OCCUPANT �S MENTAL HEALTH: A STUDY ON SINGAPORE �S OFFICE BUILDINGS. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: BCA’s Green Mark Scheme (GMS) is a popular initiative known to promote sustainability and drive the built industry towards more environment-friendly buildings. There are numerous studies on GMS and its energy conservation benefits. However, less widely known is its potential to provide a healthy indoor environmental quality (IEQ) that can enhance the mental health of occupants. As Singapore’s working population spend longer hours at work, the IEQ of an office building plays a major role on occupants’ cognitive behaviours. Therefore, this research paper explores the impact of Green Mark certified office buildings on occupant’s mental health. In this study, the objectives are: (1) To determine whether occupants in Green Mark certified office buildings display better mental health as compared to those in Non-Green Mark certified office buildings. (2) To determine if there is a significant difference in mental health between occupants from office buildings with different levels of Green Mark Grading (Certified, Gold, Gold Plus & Platinum). Empirical results showed that occupants from Green Mark certified office buildings do display better mental health in factors such as absenteeism, ability to cope with stress, productivity, stress and anxiety levels. In addition, this study found that there is a significant difference in occupant’s mental health between higher and lower tiers. Insights from professionals and explanatory research also showed that enhanced mental health in employees lead to increased job satisfaction, indirect financial paybacks and lesser staff costs. Limitations of this study include a lack of resources and time span to carry out an extensive research to further prove the association. Hence, future studies may bridge the gaps in this study and provide a holistic framework to further highlight the relationship between green buildings and mental health to the industry.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/223181
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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