Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/223145
Title: WIND : THE ALTERNATIVE SOURCE OF POWER FOR SINGAPORE AFTER SOLAR ENERGY?
Authors: CHEW KENG HUI
Keywords: Environmental Management
Master
MEM
Yung Lin Yue Lanry
2011/2012 EnvM
Environmental impacts
Renewable energy
Singapore wind trend
Wind energy
Wind energy investment
Wind siting
Wind turbines
Issue Date: 25-Jun-2012
Citation: CHEW KENG HUI (2012-06-25). WIND : THE ALTERNATIVE SOURCE OF POWER FOR SINGAPORE AFTER SOLAR ENERGY?. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: First, there is the power of the Wind, constantly exerted over the globe… Here is an almost incalculable power, yet how trifling the use we make of it.” - Henry David Thoreau, American naturalist and author (1834) Wind energy is one of the prominent renewable energy sources on earth. The utilization of wind energy is not a new technology; it is the rediscovery of a long traditional usage of wind power by civilians over thousands of years. Wind energy is derived from the conversion of the wind’s kinetic energy into other forms of useful energy such as driving wind turbines to generate electricity, wind mills for mechanical power, wind pumps for siphoning underground water or sails to propel boats and ships. To understand how wind energy can be fully captured and utilized, it is vital to appreciate the forces behind the creation of wind and its formation in relation to the Earth’s atmosphere and landscape. Previous works on wind energy by Ong (2010) and Chng (2008) have covered the feasibility studies on wind technology in Singapore and coincidentally on the implementation of micro wind turbines. Both studies however did not elaborate and justify in details on the investment costs involved and the anticipated payback periods of the proposed wind turbines to be installed. Nevertheless, Ong and Chng have concluded that the wind speed in Singapore are low and are only suitable for the implementation of small scale wind turbines to harvest wind energy. The research aims to observe whether it is feasible to harvest wind energy for commercial use and to supplement the energy generation of Singapore. Given the scarcity of land, heavy maritime traffic along the Straits of Singapore and restrictions imposed by authorities, the selection of suitable site for the implementation of wind energy development is a challenge. The historic wind data will also determine whether the amount of wind received on the Singapore Island is sufficient to harvest wind energy for commercial use against its potential energy that can be generated and the initial investment cost. Based on the analysis of the information collected, the Singapore climate is not suitable for harvesting wind energy on the commercial scale or to supplement part of the energy consumption. Other factors are taken into consideration to derive on why it is not feasible to Singapore on the commercial and will be discussed.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/223145
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