Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/222893
Title: WAYFINDING IN SUBTERRANEAN MRT STATIONS: A STUDY OF ARCHITECTURAL CUES AS WAYFINDERS
Authors: MUHAMMAD HAFIZ BIN HANIP
Keywords: Architecture
Design Technology and Sustainability
DTS
Master
Cheah Kok Ming
2012/2013 Aki DTS
Arch
Architectural cues
Environmental psychology
Subterranean train stations
Wayfinding
Issue Date: 1-Oct-2014
Citation: MUHAMMAD HAFIZ BIN HANIP (2014-10-01). WAYFINDING IN SUBTERRANEAN MRT STATIONS: A STUDY OF ARCHITECTURAL CUES AS WAYFINDERS. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: A major part of the Singapore’s public transport system consists of the Mass Rapid Transit or MRT. First completed in 1987, the system has been experiencing accelerated growth in recent years due to the government push for greater use of the public transport. With limited land, this subway expansion has mostly taken place below grade. Underground spaces can be easily disorienting due to their limited visual relations to the surface, among many other reasons. This can cause the commute via Singapore’s subway system to be potentially frustrating, stressful and hindering if the system eventually becomes expansive and if its design does not facilitate them in finding their way. This issue is especially prevalent in the context of interchanges, where an MRT line meets another and one has to make a transfer from one train to another on a separate platform. The expanding subway network would inevitably increase the number of these intersections. Considering that these would most likely to occur underground, it can potentially exacerbate the problem. Signage plays an important role in helping one find their way but the process of wayfinding does not rely exclusively on signs. Architecture also plays an equally important role in environmental communication. This dissertation examines architecture’s role in giving directional cues to the commuter. How the qualities of a space such as its colours and texture of its interior finishes consciously or subconsciously inform one on where to go. This research attempts to assess if current design processes or building codes hinders or facilitates wayfinding. Based on the findings, a set of recommendations is formulated for the improvement of current and future stations.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/222893
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