Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/222790
DC FieldValue
dc.titleEXPLORATION OF SUSTAINABLE CONSERVATION STRATEGY ON URBAN HISTORICAL DISTRICT - IN CHINA
dc.contributor.authorLU YE
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-05T08:12:53Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-22T18:16:21Z
dc.date.available2019-09-26T14:14:07Z
dc.date.available2022-04-22T18:16:21Z
dc.date.issued2014-12-05
dc.identifier.citationLU YE (2014-12-05). EXPLORATION OF SUSTAINABLE CONSERVATION STRATEGY ON URBAN HISTORICAL DISTRICT - IN CHINA. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/222790
dc.description.abstractThe ideas of urban conservation have been applied to Chinese urban planning for a few decades. However, most practices of historical conservation look at issues of conservation on building-scale rather than urban-scale spaces. The main stream concept of Chinese urban conservation is object-oriented, with less consideration in the cultural, economic and social dimensions. The dissertation first reviews the basic concept of urban conservation and its contemporary practice, especially focusing on the potential conflicts between conservation and urban development. The concept of sustainability and its application to the proposition of “sustainable conservation” was then discussed. Through literatures, the ideas of urban conservation were further explored based on theoretical debates in Chapter two. In Chapter three, two case studies of urban conservation in Chinese cities were introduced, one in Shanghai and the other in Zhaoqing of Guangzhou. The two case studies show how the conventional definition of conservation was extended and reinterpreted. We understand that the contemporary practice of Chinese urban conservation has gone beyond the heritage as object approach. In Shanghai, we saw that urban conservation deals with new urban program of art and creative industry. In the case Zhaoqing, the social and urban contextual issues have priority in the conservation planning process. In conclusion, we emphasize that urban conservation should cover cultural, economic and social dimensions. It contains both physical and non-physical aspects of planning.
dc.language.isoen
dc.sourcehttps://lib.sde.nus.edu.sg/dspace/handle/sde/2844
dc.subjectArchitecture
dc.subjectUrban Design
dc.subjectUD
dc.subjectMaster (Architecture)
dc.subjectJohannes Widodo
dc.subject2007/2008 Aki MAUD
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.departmentARCHITECTURE
dc.contributor.supervisorJOHANNES WIDODO
dc.description.degreeMaster's
dc.description.degreeconferredMASTER OF ARTS (URBAN DESIGN) (MAUD)
dc.embargo.terms2014-12-08
Appears in Collections:Master's Theses (Restricted)

Show simple item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
Lu Ye 2007-2008.pdf1.43 MBAdobe PDF

RESTRICTED

NoneLog In

Page view(s)

16
checked on Nov 17, 2022

Download(s)

3
checked on Nov 17, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.