Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/222298
Title: SPATIAL CONTESTATIONS AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS WITHIN THE SINGAPORE CHINESE DEATHSCAPE
Authors: YAP YONG KONG
Keywords: Architecture
Design Track
DT
Master (Architecture)
Jeffrey Chan Kok Hui
2016/2017 Aki DT
Death
Spatial contestation
Issue Date: 16-Jan-2017
Citation: YAP YONG KONG (2017-01-16). SPATIAL CONTESTATIONS AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS WITHIN THE SINGAPORE CHINESE DEATHSCAPE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Since the early civilisations, death has been an enduring phenomenon that has shaped human societies. It is an at once sacred yet taboo subject and has continued to be an avenue of discussion among scholars of various disciplines such as geography, urban planning, philosophy, theology etc. However, in the field of architecture and urbanism, its impact on the living has yet to be seriously studied. The spatial role of deathscapes in the urban context not only touches on the socio-cultural aspect of humanity, but it involves economics, spatial ethics and urban politics as well. As such, the following is a study of the state of affairs of the Singaporean Chinese deathscape from an urban point of view. Due to the inherent pluralism among different stakeholders in their views towards death and how it should be handled, differential values and courses of actions have been adopted. Consequently, the different moral frameworks adopted by different parties have resulted in a case of “essential injustice” as described by Davy (1996). This has further led to instances of spatial conflict and moral debate between the three main stakeholders involved - people, state and private organisations. This dissertation hypothesizes that due to the fundamental form of conflict, that is, spatial contestation resulting from differing priorities of the sacred and secular, other issues such as not-in-my-backyard (NIMBY) and commercialisation of deathscapes have crept in to further complicate the issue. The links between each instance of conflict will be investigated, along with the ethical discussions that follow. As a conclusion, the possibility of future reconciliation within this subject through agonistic debate and evolving the deathscape typology will also be discussed.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/222298
Appears in Collections:Master's Theses (Restricted)

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