Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/222249
DC FieldValue
dc.titleINVESTIGATION OF CARBON ADSORPTION/ABSORPTION CAPABILITY OF BIOCHAR FROM EICHHORNIA CRASSIPES (WATER HYACINTH) GROWN UNDER ELEVATED CARBON DIOXIDE.
dc.contributor.authorPHUA GOUYUE
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-05T04:52:07Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-22T18:01:46Z
dc.date.available2019-09-26T14:14:05Z
dc.date.available2022-04-22T18:01:46Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-05
dc.identifier.citationPHUA GOUYUE (2017-06-05). INVESTIGATION OF CARBON ADSORPTION/ABSORPTION CAPABILITY OF BIOCHAR FROM EICHHORNIA CRASSIPES (WATER HYACINTH) GROWN UNDER ELEVATED CARBON DIOXIDE.. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/222249
dc.description.abstractGlobal warming is a pertinent issue that deserves immediate attention since its impacts are on both an individual and global scale. Many methods were proposed to minimise CO2 emission but few were available for reducing atmospheric CO2. The concept of adopting biochar for atmospheric CO2 removal is not new as it has been explored extensively over the past few years. Often, studies on biochar CO2 sorption used terrestrial plant biomasses. However, this study focuses on using aquatic plants, water hyacinths, pre-treated with different CO2 conditions before biochar production. This study involves a two-stage experiment. In the first stage of the experiment, water hyacinths were exposed to elevated CO2 (20,000ppm) and ambient CO2 (400-500ppm) condition to form two types of biomass. In the subsequent stage, both types of biomasses were converted to biochar at 400⁰C. They then underwent CO2 sorption test at 1000ppm CO2 concentration and SEM. Results from CO2 sorption test revealed that biochar produced from water hyacinths subjected to elevated CO2 level exhibit better CO2 sorption ability. However, the reason for this better performance was not due to porosity, as seen from SEM. Based on a comparison with biochar produced from mung beans, water hyacinth-derived biochar fared poorer in adsorbing CO2. Nonetheless, this study has concluded that biochar produced from water hyacinths were still able to adsorb CO2 and was able to remove more CO2 when the plant was pre-treated with high CO2 level.
dc.language.isoen
dc.sourcehttps://lib.sde.nus.edu.sg/dspace/handle/sde/3784
dc.subjectBuilding
dc.subjectPFM
dc.subjectProject and Facilities Management
dc.subjectKua Harn Wei
dc.subject2016/2017 PFM
dc.subjectBiochar
dc.subjectCO2 sorption ability
dc.subjectEichhornia crassipes
dc.subjectElevated CO2
dc.subjectWater hyacinth
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.departmentBUILDING
dc.contributor.supervisorKUA HARN WEI
dc.description.degreeBachelor's
dc.description.degreeconferredBACHELOR OF SCIENCE (PROJECT AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT)
dc.embargo.terms2017-06-07
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

Show simple item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
Phua Gouyue 2016-2017.pdf2.49 MBAdobe PDF

RESTRICTED

NoneLog In

Page view(s)

21
checked on Dec 1, 2022

Download(s)

3
checked on Dec 1, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.