Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/222204
Title: THE APPLICATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE INDICATORS IN PLANNING AND MANAGING THE COASTAL ENVIRONMENT OF SINGAPORE
Authors: CHNG LI CHANG
Keywords: Environmental Management
MEM
Master (Environmental Management)
Huang Danwei
2017/2018 EnvM
Issue Date: 8-Mar-2019
Citation: CHNG LI CHANG (2019-03-08). THE APPLICATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE INDICATORS IN PLANNING AND MANAGING THE COASTAL ENVIRONMENT OF SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) has been adopted worldwide with the aim to be an effective coastal management approach. Singapore, being a member of Partnerships in Environmental Management for the Seas of East Asia (PEMSEA), established its own Integrated Urban Coastal Management programme to further enhance and manage its coastal resources. While ICM frameworks and approaches are essential, the role of indicators is equally important to test the performances of the ICM programme. As there has yet been an indicator system developed in the context of Singapore’s coastal management, I seek to test the hypothesis that a select set of environmental performance indicators is applicable and beneficial for planning and managing the coastal resources of Singapore. Through the understanding of the ICM frameworks, methods of developing indicators and an assessment of the State of the Coast of Singapore, I will use an objective-driven process method to consolidate all the relevant indicators. This framework has much flexibility as it is directed at critical environmental issues that are unique to the nation. The indicators assembled here are assessed using a weighting and scoring method as a semi-quantitative assessment to determine the final selection of indicators. The result of my comparative analysis yields a final set of 40 environmental indicators that are significant to Singapore’s IUCM programme. The selected indicators represent the critical areas of concern ranging from reducing impact from coastal development to the need to protect and preserve the remaining natural shores. Biodiversity and habitat quality makes up another important component for consideration. Indicators on conservation value, coastal habitat degradation and habitat management plan are also selected to help motivate restoration and repair of impacted coastal and marine habitats. The last two indicators in this category checks on the biological integrity of the phytoplankton, zooplankton diversity and the health of the benthic communities. Relatedly, biological effects of contaminants and introduced species are covered in this category to indicate the health of marine ecosystems. Three indicators that emphasise the fishing mortality, production rate and management plan are in place to manage the fisheries supply. Due to the busy shipping activities, Singapore’s coastal waters are vulnerable to oil spills, harmful algal blooms and persistent organic pollutants. As such, nine indicators have been selected to assess water quality. Another five indicators address the concerns of terrestrial environmental degradation due to coastal flooding, coastal erosion, solid waste pollution, shoreline destabilisation and sea-level rise. To manage emergency coastal sea incidents, the level of preparedness is also highlighted. Last but not least, value and benefit to the human population are also chosen to integrate the physical coastal environment with the daily lifestyles of the public by creating recreational opportunities and places to connect people. In conclusion, the 40 suggested indicators are only a fundamental beginning, the next natural steps are to quantify the indicators in greater detail and set measurable targets. Therefore, let this fundamental beginning continue to be developed so that we can enhance our coastal biodiversity and keep our marine environment active, safe and healthy.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/222204
Appears in Collections:Master's Theses (Restricted)

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