Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/222061
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dc.titleLISTENING TO THE KATSURA IMPERIAL VILLA (THE MUSIC OF TORU TAKEMITSU)
dc.contributor.authorLEM YANG FONG
dc.date.accessioned2011-02-14T04:24:56Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-22T17:55:58Z
dc.date.available2019-09-26T14:14:03Z
dc.date.available2022-04-22T17:55:58Z
dc.date.issued2011-02-14
dc.identifier.citationLEM YANG FONG (2011-02-14). LISTENING TO THE KATSURA IMPERIAL VILLA (THE MUSIC OF TORU TAKEMITSU). ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/222061
dc.description.abstractIt seems problematic to even attempt to draw a relation between architecture and music, two disciplines that are distant by association. Architecture involves the organizing physical space to serve a social function, while music involves the choreography of physically intangible sounds to invoke sensations. Yet this relationship had already been drawn through the music of Toru Takemitsu. While Toru Takemitsu seemed to have handled this arduous task with characteristic elegance, the fresh soundscapes he sculpted ranges from contemplative chimes to climaxes that borders on violence. This is evidence of the violence veiled with master manipulation of space physically, as well as musically. Similar to the fresh soundscapes/techniques he offered to music, the works of Toru Takemitsu also provides a fresh perspective on Architecture in our age. Given that his music had borrowed heavily from architecture, we can infer that beyond the physical reality, architecture exists in his music as a generator. Being disciplines commonly considered exclusive, bridging the divide between architecture and music invokes fresh sensations. The project assumes that architecture does not remain static in the process of being ‘absorbed’ as a generator for music; instead, a copy of itself is created that shifts temporary from its association with the physically tangible into a virtual plane. Further assuming that the shift is only temporary, the return of this copy of architecture (back into physicality) is also possible. Whether an external force is required, or it happens within itself, that discussion is beyond the scope of this paper. Similarly, the new form of such a copied architecture is worth another investigative exercise in itself. Before attempting to answer the questions mentioned above, this paper aims to first create a background to the issue, through examining the process underlying the transformation.
dc.language.isoen
dc.sourcehttps://lib.sde.nus.edu.sg/dspace/handle/sde/1421
dc.subjectArchitecture
dc.subjectDesign Track
dc.subjectErwin John Soriano Viray
dc.subject2010/2011 DT
dc.subjectKatsura
dc.subjectMusic
dc.subjectTakemitsu
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.departmentARCHITECTURE
dc.contributor.supervisorERWIN JOHN SORIANO VIRAY
dc.description.degreeMaster's
dc.description.degreeconferredMASTER OF ARCHITECTURE (M.ARCH)
dc.embargo.terms2011-02-15
Appears in Collections:Master's Theses (Restricted)

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