Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/221939
Title: FUTURE ROLES OF THERMAL POWER PLANTS IN SINGAPORE'S ELECTRICITY MIX
Authors: KOH YAO MING
Keywords: Environmental Management
MEM
Master (Environmental Management)
Study Report (MEM)
Pranav S Joshi
2018/2019 EnvM
Issue Date: 2-Jan-2020
Citation: KOH YAO MING (2020-01-02). FUTURE ROLES OF THERMAL POWER PLANTS IN SINGAPORE'S ELECTRICITY MIX. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: In 2015, under the INDC submission to the UNFCCC, Singapore has pledged to reduce the amount of GHGs emitted per dollar GDP by 36% from 2005 levels by 2030, and to stabilize emissions with the aim of peaking around 2030. The most significant component of GHG emissions in Singapore is carbon dioxide, whose one of the major sources is thermal power plant industry. In order to achieve its INDC goal and enhance energy security (considering Singapore’s reliance on imported natural gas to generate most of its electricity in thermal power plants), Singapore is continuously exploring options to diversify electricity generation technologies. To this end, it is worthwhile to examine future roles of thermal power plants in Singapore’s electricity mix. The study presented in this study report addresses this issue in the context of Singapore’s national policy to look beyond 2020 to further raise the contribution of solar power to 1 GWp, which represents about 20% of the current peak demand, and beyond 1 GWp, in order to support its 2030 INDC goal (considering the perceived limited viability of geothermal, wind, tidal wave, hydro-power and nuclear fission and fusion in local context). It also examines three case studies on Australia pertaining to South Australian state, which highlight an important finding that renewable power supplies from wind and solar can disrupt a liberalized electricity market with their low energy prices, especially when weather conditions are satisfactory. This may force the traditional power plants to operate below their demand, leading to oversupply of electricity and loss of business. However, when weather conditions are not satisfactory, or when renewable energy installations are damaged, the price of electricity will be determined by the traditional power plants, forcing the consumes to pay high prices, affecting the supply security, grid stability and image of the energy market authority. Since Singapore has also implemented a liberalized electricity market, Singapore will need to consider these factors, as the contributions of solar installations will continue to rise in future, with additional factors determined by the market rules on providing reserves in the power systems, industrial demand, population dynamics, energy efficiency measures, smart grid and storage installations, and climate change initiatives such as carbon tax. As part of the comprehensive strategy to grow local gas market and support the growth of gas-related business like power generation and industrial heating, Singapore has also planned to develop mega projects such as second LNG terminal. With this plan, the thermal power plants operating on natural gas will benefit due to enhanced security of supplies, and they will continue to play a major in the electricity market. In conclusion, while Singapore is rightly moving towards increasing use of renewables to support its INDC goal and energy security, it is very likely that Singapore will continue to be largely dependent on thermal power generation to meet its energy needs, at least for the next two decades.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/221939
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