Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/221589
Title: SUSTAINING SPORTING MEGA-EVENTS: BROKEN PROMISES, FAST CARS AND SINGAPORE �S NEW SPORTS HUB
Authors: XIE YANGLEI
Keywords: Architecture
Design Technology and Sustainability
DTS
Master
Chang Jiat Hwee
2013/2014 Aki DTS
Climate change
Formula One
London
Mega-events
Olympic Games
Singapore
Sports Hub
Sustainability
Sydney
Youth Olympic Games
Issue Date: 5-Nov-2013
Citation: XIE YANGLEI (2013-11-05). SUSTAINING SPORTING MEGA-EVENTS: BROKEN PROMISES, FAST CARS AND SINGAPORE �S NEW SPORTS HUB. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: There are two contradictory tendencies in the world today: 1) the desire to create “urban spectacles” in hosting mega-events for the promise of economic gains and as a signifier of global status, and 2) the concerns of climate change leading to increased public awareness on the issues of sustainability and how it will affect the world that we live in today for our future generations. As mega-events grew in magnitude and stature, the toll that it takes on the environment becomes greater. The Olympics, as a sporting mega-event, is one key example. Sporting events tend to impact the built environment more in particular because of the need to build extravagant stadiums to make a grand statement, and other supporting venues to facilitate the Games. With so much resource used in a short time of a few years, for an event that lasts no more than four weeks, how can any sporting mega-event claim to be sustainable? This dissertation discusses the Sydney and London Olympics, both of which proclaimed as “the most sustainable”, based on the prevailing assumption that cities will persist in competing to host mega-events in pursuit of economic growth. In particular, the role of the built environment will be examined in extracting the successes and failures of Sydney and London. Singapore’s rise to prominence into an international city has been nothing short to meteoric. Hosting the SEAP Games allowed it to carry out urban renewal plans quickly, and at the same time announce its arrival to the region, and then to the world. Given its small size and limited resources, it warrants a closer look at whether Singapore’s continued aspirations to host large-scale events has been done so with environmental protection in mind. Invariably, Singapore’s hosting of the Formula One Grand Prix night race and 2010 Youth Olympic Games fell short of its sustainability vision. The completion of the Sports Hub in 2014 will allow Singapore to aim for larger events in future. This dissertation finds that Sports Hub’s public-private partnership approach seems sound in theory, but whether it will make Singapore’s events landscape a more sustainable one in future remains to be seen.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/221589
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