Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/220830
Title: LOOKING BEYOND 'SUNDAY ETHNIC ENCLAVES': SPATIAL (IN)JUSTICE IN PUBLIC OPEN SPACES FOR FOREIGN DOMESTIC WORKERS � IN SINGAPORE
Authors: ALVIEDO DIONNE ROBIN MENEZ
Keywords: 2020-2021
Real Estate
Bachelor's
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (REAL ESTATE)
Wong Khei Mie Grace
Foreign Domestic Workers
Public Open Spaces
Spatial Justice
Urban Planning
Issue Date: 14-Apr-2021
Citation: ALVIEDO DIONNE ROBIN MENEZ (2021-04-14). LOOKING BEYOND 'SUNDAY ETHNIC ENCLAVES': SPATIAL (IN)JUSTICE IN PUBLIC OPEN SPACES FOR FOREIGN DOMESTIC WORKERS � IN SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Due to their line of work within residential homes, Foreign Domestic Workers are often described as the ‘invisible backbone of many metropolitan economies’ (Sternberg, 2019). Their presence, however, become more prevalent on Sundays during their day- off as they are seen congregating in public parks and within their ‘Sunday ethnic enclaves’. Unavoidably, tensions and conflict arise with locals as these migrant women congregate in masses to occupy certain Public Open Spaces. Past literatures have shined light on the lived experiences of these women through feminist-oriented and place-based geographical approaches. However, there have been very few scholars who performed empirical research to the topic of these migrant women and their use of Public Open Spaces in Singapore. Hence, this dissertation takes on a quantitative approach in examining Foreign Domestic Workers leisure behaviours and their use of Public Open Spaces. More importantly, it adopts the Spatial Justice tripartite framework of Physical Justice, Social Justice and Rights to the City to assess the existing public spaces within a. Sunday ethnic enclaves, b. Central Region and c. Outside Central Region. Due to the on-going COVID-19 pandemic, surveys were conducted online amongst Filipino Foreign Domestic Workers. A total of 525 responses were collected. The study found that the migrant women tend to gather in large groups within the Central Region. A series of empirical analyses also found that the female migrants experience varying degree of Spatial Justice in the different Public Open Spaces. Sunday ethnic enclaves provide a lower sense of Physical Justice while spaces within Outside Central Region provide a greater sense of Rights to the City. Overall, Rights to the City scores the lowest in terms of the three aspect of Spatial Justice. In conclusion, there is a strong need to address the welfare of Foreign Domestic Workers in terms of Public Open Spaces to achieve a Spatially Just Singapore.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/220830
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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