Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/220812
Title: PLANNING FOR A CYCLING CITY: DOES THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT MATTER?
Authors: CHUA PUNG YEE
Keywords: RE
2018/2019 RE
Lee Kwan Ok
Cycling
Bicycle
TPB
Real Estate
Issue Date: 14-May-2019
Citation: CHUA PUNG YEE (2019-05-14). PLANNING FOR A CYCLING CITY: DOES THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT MATTER?. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Over the past decade, measures to promote cycling as an active form of transport in Singapore were mainly guided by the vision charted out under the National Cycling Plan (NCP). Arguably, one of the most prominent features of the NCP pertains to its objective of developing a cycling network of over 700 kilometres in length by 2030. Given that the decision to adopt cycling as a means of transport ultimately hinges on an array of factors, this research is intended to explore the impact of cycling infrastructure on the individual’s intention to cycle as a means of transport. Using Azjen’s Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB Azjen, 1991) as a starting point, this research utilises an extended construct and incorporate social and physical (built) environment factors to assess the individual’s cycling intention. Objective measures were used to identify the ‘control’ and ‘treatment’ groups based on the length of cycling network across all 55 planning areas across Singapore. Further, 400 effective survey responses were collected from the ‘control’ and ‘treatment’ planning areas for a series of empirical analyses including t-Tests, ANOVA, multiple and ordinal regressions. Findings reveal proximity from area of residences to the nearest cycling path to be statistically insignificant in predicting bicycle use. However, the presence of a cycling path near a respondent’s residential location was found to positively influence respondents’ attitudes towards cycling as a means of transport. Results suggest that interventions to promote cycling at the individual level could introduce “soft” measures such as promotional programmes or awareness campaigns to complement existing policies focused on the built environment. Driving an effective integration of “soft” measures to existing improvements in the built environment may thus prove pivotal in effecting behavioural changes and encouraging bicycle use.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/220812
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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