Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/220688
Title: LONELINESS, SOCIAL INTERACTION AND MALL SHOPPING MOTIVATIONS OF TEEN SHOPPERS IN SINGAPORE
Authors: WONG XING JIE
Keywords: Real Estate
Muhammad Faishal Bin Ibrahim
2010/2011 RE
Issue Date: 19-Apr-2011
Citation: WONG XING JIE (2011-04-19). LONELINESS, SOCIAL INTERACTION AND MALL SHOPPING MOTIVATIONS OF TEEN SHOPPERS IN SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Youth shopping has been observed as a growing segment of the consumer population, both globally and locally. Teen shoppers need to gain special attention from retailers, marketers and educators in the local retail scene because of their unique demographic and psychological characteristics. However, unlike the Western settings, potential of this segment in Asia has not been matched by research to understand this phenomenon. As a result, this study sought to explore Singaporean teenagers‘ mall shopping motivations and their shopping behavior and patterns. More specifically, this study examines the relationships between loneliness, social interaction and the varying shopping experiences. Qualitative and quantitative aspects of research were undertaken to have a better understanding of the pertaining issues. Qualitative research via in-depth interviews conducted in local malls uncovered six mall shopping motivations - five hedonic and one utilitarian that existed among teenagers who frequent the malls. They are social shopping, adventure shopping, idea shopping, gratification shopping, role shopping and specific shopping. Data collected in the quantitative phase further attests the growing affluent and consumption power of teen shoppers in Singapore. Surveys were carried out in five shopping malls and a total of 495 completed questionnaires were obtained. Tabulated survey results demonstrated that more than half of the sample size respondents go to the shopping mall at least two to three times a week and shop for relatively long hours. Furthermore, 47% of them spend between S$20 to S$50 and an astonishing 2% spend more than S$100 in a week. This huge expenditure can be explained by higher allowance obtained by teenagers and the fact that at least a third of those surveyed held part-time jobs. Confirming existing literature, findings in this study have suggested that social shopping is imperative to teen shoppers in Singapore. At the same time, they are also very likely to make a specific purchase. It is worthy of note that idea shopping and gratification shopping were not as important to teen shoppers as opposed to the aforementioned mall shopping motivations. Furthermore, loneliness was not significantly related to any of the six mall shopping motivations. Interestingly, if teen shoppers used shopping to cope with loneliness, they were more likely to shop for specific items and self gratification and less likely to shop for social reasons. In other words, when a teen is shopping because he or she is feeling lonely, he or she would focus more on personal needs, rather than treating shopping as a social activity.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/220688
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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