Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/220610
Title: DO GREEN MARK CONDOMINIUMS IN SINGAPORE COST LESS TO MAINTAIN?
Authors: XIE YIYAO
Keywords: Real Estate
RE
2017/2018 RE
Yu Shi Ming
Green Mark
Maintenance Fund
Maintenance Costs
Private Residential
Condominiums
Issue Date: 2-May-2018
Citation: XIE YIYAO (2018-05-02). DO GREEN MARK CONDOMINIUMS IN SINGAPORE COST LESS TO MAINTAIN?. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The Green Mark (GM) scheme was introduced by the Building and Construction Authority of Singapore in 2005 to encourage environmentally friendly buildings and promote sustainability. This research is the first study to explore the impact of GM certification on maintenance costs in Singapore's private residential developments. It contributes to the lack of literature regarding maintenance costs of GM residential developments. Maintenance fund plays a crucial role in the sustainability of a development because it translates to a significant overhead cost spread across the entire life cycle of the building that occupants will have to bear. Therefore, it is imperative to study whether green condominiums are less costly to maintain, which in the long term, helps to ensure the sustainability of the built environment. The main methodology used is multiple linear regression and a case study to gain an in-depth understanding of maintenance fund breakdown. Results show no statistically significant relationship between GM condominiums and maintenance fund paid. This could be because operational cost savings enjoyed by green condominiums in some aspects like utilities are offset by other areas that cost more to maintain, which may lead to a zero net effect. However, total operating expenses for green condominiums are generally lower than non-green condominiums, just that it is not reflected in maintenance fund. The GM Gold level is found to be the most cost-effective design. These findings have implications on homebuyers, developers and government authorities.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/220610
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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