Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/220270
Title: CHALLENGES IN PHASING OUT HYDROFLUOROCARBONS AND POLICY IMPLICATIONS
Authors: WONG SHU YEE
Keywords: Environmental Management
MEM
Master (Environmental Management)
2019/2020 EnvM
Study Report (MEM)
Yu Liya
Issue Date: 27-Aug-2020
Citation: WONG SHU YEE (2020-08-27). CHALLENGES IN PHASING OUT HYDROFLUOROCARBONS AND POLICY IMPLICATIONS. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are synthetic greenhouse gases with high global warming potential and they were created as replacements for ozone-depleting substances (ODS). The growth rate of HFCs in the atmosphere have been increasing over the years as a result of the phase out of ODS under the Montreal Protocol. The refrigeration and air-conditioning sector is the largest category of use for HFCs, followed by foam production, aerosols and fire protection systems. The main challenge in implementing a phase out of HFCs is the lack of a silver bullet solution that can replace the use of HFCs across the variety of its current applications. While alternatives to the use of HFCs may exist for some applications, they may not always compare favourably with HFCs and require trade-offs to be made. There may also be barriers that hinder their widespread adoption. For refrigeration and air-conditioning systems, hydrocarbons, ammonia and CO2 are alternatives to HFCs, but there are some limitations in terms of flammability, toxicity and efficiency that could require complex system designs and incur higher costs, as well as skilled workers to operate. In addition, the existing building and fire safety codes could be barriers to the adoption of hydrocarbon and ammonia based systems.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/220270
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