Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/220219
Title: RUINED ARCHITECTURE: AN ALTERNATIVE SINGAPORE STORY
Authors: WONG SHI MIN SERENE
Keywords: Architecture
Design Track
DT
Master (Architecture)
Imran Bin Tajudeen
2015/2016 Aki DT
Rubbish Theory
Ruins
Singapore
Value
Issue Date: 14-Dec-2015
Citation: WONG SHI MIN SERENE (2015-12-14). RUINED ARCHITECTURE: AN ALTERNATIVE SINGAPORE STORY. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: This dissertation employed qualitative methods in the effort to gather information on the theoretical discourse of architectural ruins in Singapore. This theoretical discourse served as a discursive exploration into the mutable value of architectural ruins through the discussion of Thompson’s Rubbish Theory, where the change of state between social categories and thus change in value forms the basis of the framework. A rigorous application of the framework to seven case studies was carried out using the deductive method. By evaluating the timeline of developments that happen to a particular case study, one can deduce whether the development conforms to Thompson’s predictions of how the change of state and value occurs. Even if the case study develops in a way that is different from the hypothesis of the Rubbish Theory framework, the reasons can still be deduced. This paper will be presented in 6 chapters. Chapter 1 introduces the antithetical notion of architectural ruination as an entity of the Modern era. A theoretical framework to evaluate ruin value is introduced – Thompson’s Rubbish Theory. The context of this dissertation and the research objectives of this study are put out. There are two parts to the inquiry: Firstly, the current attitudes and approaches of Singapore’s authorities towards ruined architecture is questioned. Secondly, this inquiry also seeks to use the Rubbish Theory framework to understand the way socially constructed value is conferred upon a ruin and how this value is relative to time, social categories and the multiplicity of the actors involved rather than just the mere physical state of the ruin. Chapter 2 reviews the literature on architectural ruination as a discursive. The discussion is divided into 4 themes that explore ruins as a discursive through concepts such as metaphor, representation and fear. The overview of architectural ruination in Singapore’s context - namely the type of ruination and reasons why ruination happens even in the hands of a tightly controlled state, is also discussed here. Existing explanations and the literature gap will be discussed. Chapter 3 presents the analysis of 7 local case studies according to a modified version of the Rubbish Theory framework - namely Tanglin Hill Brunei Hostel, Istana Woodneuk, Old Changi Hospital, Cashin House, Matilda House, Kampong Lorong Buangkok and Istana Kampong Glam. Chapter 4 presents the overall analysis and evaluation of the framework and attempts to respond to all the research questions raised. Chapter 5 serves as a supplementary appendix with additional information for the various case studies. Chapter 6 cites in detail all the sources used and referenced over the course of this written dissertation. In summary, this paper points out the various divergences and differences that have manifested in the case studies when evaluated according to the theoretical framework of Thompson’s Rubbish Theory of value creation. Most of the case studies discussed in this essay also highlight situations contrary to Jeremy Till’s usage of Rubbish Theory in architecture. The reality of things are not always as simple and straightforward as theory makes them out to be. The intangible complexities of architecture often go unnoticed when oversimplification occurs.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/220219
Appears in Collections:Master's Theses (Restricted)

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