Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/220156
Title: THERMAL TRANSIENT SENSATIONS UNDER DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS
Authors: ONG WEI QI KEN
Keywords: Building
PFM
Project and Facilities Management
Tham Kwok Wai
2016/2017 PFM
Active behaviour
Perspiration rate
Thermal sensation
Thermal transient condition
Thermal transient sensation
Issue Date: 2-Jun-2017
Citation: ONG WEI QI KEN (2017-06-02). THERMAL TRANSIENT SENSATIONS UNDER DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Energy consumption through air-conditioning is a critical issue to building owners in tropical countries. Thermal transient sensation is important because it affects the thermal exposure from outdoor to indoor condition. However, little to none has been done to understand thermal transient sensation and how it affects our daily lives, especially in an educational institution perspective. Thus, this study on thermal transient sensation is conducted. 20 students have participated in this experiment. The optimal condition to achieve a balance between energy savings and productivity is 26°C with fan. Additionally, air movement was found to have an influence in thermal sensation, especially in warmer indoor conditions. There was a significant difference in the thermal transient sensations at 23°C against 26°C, without fans, but not for 23°C without fan and 26°C with fan. The perspiration rate was found to have higher significance of coefficient correlation to thermal sensation only at the initial stage of 23°C without fan. Furthermore, subjects increase their fan speeds at warmer temperature when experiencing the same thermal sensation. This study finds how air movement may compensate for higher temperature which defrays the widely conceived theory of 26°C being the optimal temperature for student. Implications for energy-saving strategies can be created for future research to building owners, especially to education institution.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/220156
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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