Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/220081
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dc.titlePROMOTING COMMUNITY IN HDBS
dc.contributor.authorNURBATRISYIA BTE YAZID
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-31T07:48:43Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-22T15:52:04Z
dc.date.available2021-06-14
dc.date.available2022-04-22T15:52:04Z
dc.date.issued2021-05-31
dc.identifier.citationNURBATRISYIA BTE YAZID (2021-05-31). PROMOTING COMMUNITY IN HDBS. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/220081
dc.description.abstractThreatening divisive forces, be it foreign or internal, have made it so that there is a need for a stronger sense of community in Singapore. This is made especially so with the advent use of social media where differences in views are amplified by a magnitude causing extreme polarisation of views to take root. Making up 80% of the population, HDB estates (HDBs) serve as a vital ground for social engineering. This means that whatever impact made towards this group, be it via policies or initiatives, would therefore, have a significant impact on Singapore overall. Incorporating common spaces into HDB estates in the 1970s is just one way the government has attempted to increase sense of community. Common spaces serve as a crucial avenue for informal interactions, which are ultimately the key in promoting community spirit. Although much research has looked into common spaces and its relationship with community spirit, there is a lack of research that looks into which common spaces in HDB estates are absolutely vital in increasing community spirit. This study makes use of an empirical research study. A survey questionnaire was used to collect information regarding respondents’ interactions with neighbours at common spaces, the strength of their sense of community using McMillan & Chavis’s Sense of Community Index as well as their opinions on how to improve community spirit. A total of 204 responses were collected. Analysis from such data found that corridors and lift lobbies are considered to be the key common spaces in promoting community spirit as these two spaces were where respondents interacted with neighbours the most. In addition, respondents often perceived the community spirit in their neighbourhood much weaker than it actually is which could be attributed to a different interpretation of the term “community spirit”. Recommendations were also made to improve community spirit in this study. The study then concludes by addressing the contributions of this study alongside its limitations. Possible recommendations were also made for future work.
dc.language.isoen
dc.sourcehttps://lib.sde.nus.edu.sg/dspace/handle/sde/5025
dc.subject2020-2021
dc.subjectBuilding
dc.subjectBachelor's
dc.subjectBACHELOR OF SCIENCE (PROJECT AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT)
dc.subjectTeo Ho Pin
dc.subjectCommunity Spirit
dc.subjectHDB
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.departmentBUILDING
dc.contributor.supervisorTEO HO PIN
dc.description.degreeBachelor's
dc.description.degreeconferredBACHELOR OF SCIENCE (PROJECT AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT)
dc.embargo.terms2021-06-14
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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