Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/219822
Title: BIG & GREEN GOLF COURSE : TOWARD SUSTAINABILITY IN THE 21ST CENTURY
Authors: LIANKHANLUN NGAIHTE
Keywords: Environmental Management
Master (Environmental Management)
George Ofori
2009/2010 EnvM
MEM
Issue Date: 2-Mar-2011
Citation: LIANKHANLUN NGAIHTE (2011-03-02). BIG & GREEN GOLF COURSE : TOWARD SUSTAINABILITY IN THE 21ST CENTURY. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: A number of golf courses in Singapore are being constructed and due to Singapore’s rapid population growth and more people being expected to pick up the game, the demand for more golf courses is expected to increase in the coming years. Singapore, in spite of its small size has the fastest growing urban population in the world which is projected to hit 5.5 million over the next 40–50 years and is the fastest growing economy in the region (Singapore Concept Plan 2001). With an increasing population, the demand for more golf courses will increase. The total number of golf courses in Singapore has now reached 22. But the rapid increase in the number of golf courses is a cause for environmental concern all over the world. By nature of the game, golf courses have a huge foot print on land and are maintenance intensive. Some of the golf courses are not maintained properly causing pollution of the environment. Singapore is not immune to such degradation of environment from unsustainable practices. In Singapore, the awareness of environmental issues has been at the forefront since the founding of the country in 1965 and it has made great progress in improving environmental quality, making it one of the world’s cleanest cities and liveable cities. There is a subsidy from the public sector for sustainable initiatives, with incentives for developers and the community to participate in and develop more sustainable practices. Nevertheless, with improved life styles, the demand for recreational and leisure activities increases, putting more pressure on land. Singapore has released the Singapore Green Plan (SGP) which also plans to protect the little forest it has. But, the need for conserving nature often clashes with the need for infrastructure and development. xii In an attempt to address the issues of development and conserving nature, this dissertation identifies that there are strategies that can be applied to the development of sustainable golf communities. These strategies will be helpful because they can create tangible values for the stakeholders. Creating tangible value for stakeholders will encourage dialogues and better understanding. A number of approaches are discussed with focus on sustainability. The objective of the study is to show that if tangible value can be created in golf courses which are blamed for a big part of environmental degradation in the community development, then it can ensure a ‘win-win’ situation for all stakeholders and the environment. From the study, it is found that the sustainable aspect of golf course is not fully developed. The golf course management need to widen the scope of sustainability to involve more people, each having a different role but working for the common good.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/219822
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