Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/219588
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dc.titleTHE IMPLEMENTATION OF SUSTAINABLE MATERIALS IN SINGAPORE
dc.contributor.authorTRAN TUAN VU
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-30T09:02:31Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-22T15:36:47Z
dc.date.available2019-09-26T14:13:50Z
dc.date.available2022-04-22T15:36:47Z
dc.date.issued2014-06-30
dc.identifier.citationTRAN TUAN VU (2014-06-30). THE IMPLEMENTATION OF SUSTAINABLE MATERIALS IN SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/219588
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is formulated to address the concern of Singapore’s construction industry on its heavy dependency on concrete and other natural materials such as sand and granite as the main construction material. Following the sand ban from Indonesia that took effect from 23 January 2007, Singapore is moving towards less concrete-based construction and adopting more sustainable construction practices. The aim of this dissertation is to study the various sustainable construction methods or materials that can help to reduce the reliance of concrete. The scope of the study is limited to eco-concrete that is increasingly used in residential construction. Interviews and questionnaires were conducted with the relevant stakeholders including the eco-concrete suppliers, contractors and building occupiers to understand their opinions on the current implementation of eco-concrete in local projects. Besides their opinions also provide feedbacks to the strategies that Singapore’s government have adopted to encourage sustainable development. Currently, although there is no complaint from the occupiers about the quality of eco-concrete, the contractors are only using eco-concrete to achieve the requirement of Green Mark Scheme and the contract due to the higher price and also the skeptical concern about quality of eco-concrete. However, with the future technologies in treatment of recycled materials and recycling process, the suppliers are confident that they are able to reduce the cost and improve the quality of eco-concrete. The Singapore Government also understand this and that could be the reason why BCA only limit the usage of eco-concrete to 20% and does not allow eco-concrete to be used for structural components yet. But the industry can expect that this will soon change as new technologies in eco-concrete manufacturing in Singapore now can produce Grade 50 concrete. Less concrete, sustainable construction is possible with new technologies in treatment of recycled materials and recycling process together with strong support from Singapore government as well as strong cooperation between various stakeholders such as between government and private sectors like the contractors and suppliers.
dc.language.isoen
dc.sourcehttps://lib.sde.nus.edu.sg/dspace/handle/sde/2605
dc.subjectSustainable Construction Materials
dc.subjectBuilding
dc.subjectPFM
dc.subjectProject and Facilities Management
dc.subjectGoh Bee Hua
dc.subject2013/2014 PFM
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.departmentBUILDING
dc.contributor.supervisorGOH BEE HUA
dc.description.degreeBachelor's
dc.description.degreeconferredBACHELOR OF SCIENCE (PROJECT AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT)
dc.embargo.terms2014-07-12
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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