Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2021.106207
Title: Effectiveness of Public Education Campaigns for Stroke Symptom Recognition and Response in Non-Elderly Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Authors: Jiayi Tan
Sheena Ramazanu 
Sok Ying Liaw 
Wei Ling Chua 
Keywords: Stroke
Education
Symptom recognition, Behavioral influence
Systematic review
Issue Date: 24-Oct-2021
Citation: Jiayi Tan, Sheena Ramazanu, Sok Ying Liaw, Wei Ling Chua (2021-10-24). Effectiveness of Public Education Campaigns for Stroke Symptom Recognition and Response in Non-Elderly Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases 31 (2). ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2021.106207
Abstract: Objectives The incidence of stroke is on the rise among younger adults. Stroke educational campaigns are often used to raise public knowledge of stroke warning signs and response actions, but their effectiveness in non-elderly adults is unclear. This study investigated the effectiveness of stroke campaigns in improving stroke symptom recognition and intention to call emergency medical services in adults aged < 65 years, and described the characteristics of public stroke education in this demographic group. Materials and methods Seven databases (Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, Scopus, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses) were searched from inception to 24 January 2021. A meta-analysis was conducted to synthesize the effects of stroke education campaigns on stroke symptom recognition and intention to call emergency medical services in adults < 65 years. A narrative synthesis approach was used to explore the types of educational content and campaign best suited to this demographic group. Results Thirteen studies from 2001 to 2019 were included in this review. Out of the thirteen studies, five were included in the meta-analysis to synthesize the effects of stroke education campaigns on symptom recognition and four were included for synthesizing the effects on intention to call emergency medical services. The estimated pooled risk ratio for post-campaign compared with pre-campaign in stroke symptom recognition and intention to call emergency medical services was 1.20 (95% CI: 1.07–1.36, p = 0.002) and 1.19 (95% CI: 1.11–1.28, p < 0.00001), respectively. Usage of acronyms in broadcast and digital media campaigns appears promising in enhancing recognition of and responsiveness to stroke symptoms. Conclusions Public stroke education campaigns were found to have a significant impact on stroke symptom recognition and intention to call emergency medical services. The evidence generated from this review could be applied to inform future campaigns targeted at younger adults.
Source Title: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/219239
ISSN: 1052-3057
DOI: 10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2021.106207
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