Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/215099
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dc.titlePASSION MADE POSSIBLE: BRANDING SINGAPORE TO NATIONS AND LOCALS
dc.contributor.authorABIGAIL LOIS YONG HUI YING
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-09T09:17:56Z
dc.date.available2022-02-09T09:17:56Z
dc.date.issued2021-06-11
dc.identifier.citationABIGAIL LOIS YONG HUI YING (2021-06-11). PASSION MADE POSSIBLE: BRANDING SINGAPORE TO NATIONS AND LOCALS. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/215099
dc.description.abstractThe construction of meanings through campaigning in media texts is not a direct translation of the meanings that are internalised and admitted by the external and internal audiences. Instead, individuals may approach the representations of the nation put forward by the constructed brand identity in different ways. This study investigates how citizens negotiate or resist such representations. The importance of this study will show how the value of choosing certain representations over another in media texts for nation branding can be crucial. The findings of this study highlights how the campaign has undoubtedly sparked the main themes of governmentality and a resistance towards being governed as the individuals adopt a global consciousness. It represents the strategic movement from the governing body to place Singapore as the top-of-mind country to invest in as it directs its people to be a knowledge and creative hub—which is forecasted to be the driving force of modern-day economy. Singaporeans do see that there are more day-to-day things beyond what is shown in the campaign. National tourism videos are commissioned in many countries, this dissertation investigates how “Passion Made Possible”, a Singapore Tourism Board promotion video reflects and disseminates a version of nationalised identity that while resonating with its youth market also generated a disconnect to where the nation is trying to go and where it currently stands. Since most of the participants were in the middle 20s, they share that the strong pragmatic sentiments from the past still hold on to their present. This study also shows how the participants are reactive to the actions by the government, that they do not see a need for brand commitment.
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.departmentCOMMUNICATIONS AND NEW MEDIA
dc.contributor.supervisorJINNA TAY
dc.description.degreeBachelor's
dc.description.degreeconferredBachelor of Social Sciences (Honours)
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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