Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9121433
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dc.titleWhat influences health professionals’ recommendations for non-scheduled childhood vaccinations? A qualitative study of health professionals’ perspectives in three provinces of china
dc.contributor.authorCheng, J
dc.contributor.authorLin, S
dc.contributor.authorWu, C
dc.contributor.authorHoward, N
dc.contributor.authorZou, J
dc.contributor.authorSun, FY
dc.contributor.authorSun, M
dc.contributor.authorChantler, T
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-03T05:46:35Z
dc.date.available2022-01-03T05:46:35Z
dc.date.issued2021-12-01
dc.identifier.citationCheng, J, Lin, S, Wu, C, Howard, N, Zou, J, Sun, FY, Sun, M, Chantler, T (2021-12-01). What influences health professionals’ recommendations for non-scheduled childhood vaccinations? A qualitative study of health professionals’ perspectives in three provinces of china. Vaccines 9 (12) : 1433-1433. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9121433
dc.identifier.issn2076393X
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/212800
dc.description.abstractRecommendations by health professionals are important for vaccines that are not included in national schedules. This study explored health professionals’ perspectives on recommending non-scheduled (user-fee) childhood vaccinations in China, identifying key influences on professionals’ interactions with caregivers. We conducted individual semi-structured interviews with 20 health professionals from three provinces in China and analyzed data thematically using deductive and inductive coding. Health professionals from all three provinces were uncomfortable about being perceived to encourage parents to accept vaccines that incurred a fee. They provided information about non-scheduled vaccines but emphasized parental autonomy in decision-making. Rural parents were less aware of unscheduled vaccines and health professionals were more likely to encourage parents living in more affluent areas to consider these vaccines; varicella vaccine was preferred by parents as a way of preventing school absence. Economic incentives for unscheduled vaccines were given to staff at most study sites, although the amount given varied widely. These variations meant that staff receiving lower incentives were not motivated to promote non-scheduled vaccines if their workload was high; on the contrary, those receiving higher incentives were more likely to promote these vaccines. Health professionals need more guidance on how to recommend unscheduled vaccines in an informative, positive and appropriate manner. It is evident that parents’ awareness of these vaccines, and their economic circumstances, influence vaccinators recommendation practice. Economic incentives prompted health professionals to recommend non-scheduled vaccines; however, the application of such staff incentives varied widely in China. To adopt appropriate economic incentives, professional organizations should develop protocols for the use of incentives that account for their influence on recommendation practices. Suitable recommendation policy needs to balance basic salaries with performance-based incentives, consider overall workload, and include monitoring and evaluation of economic incentives.
dc.publisherMDPI AG
dc.sourceElements
dc.subjecteconomic incentives
dc.subjectmotivation
dc.subjectqualitative research
dc.subjectrecommendations
dc.subjectvaccines
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-01-03T03:13:18Z
dc.contributor.departmentDEAN'S OFFICE (SSH SCH OF PUBLIC HEALTH)
dc.description.doi10.3390/vaccines9121433
dc.description.sourcetitleVaccines
dc.description.volume9
dc.description.issue12
dc.description.page1433-1433
dc.published.statePublished
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