Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-54715-9
Title: Population genomics of two congeneric Palaearctic shorebirds reveals differential impacts of Quaternary climate oscillations across habitats types
Authors: Tan, H.Z. 
Ng, E.Y.X. 
Tang, Q. 
Allport, G.A.
Jansen, J.J.F.J.
Tomkovich, P.S.
Rheindt, F.E. 
Issue Date: 2019
Publisher: Nature Research
Citation: Tan, H.Z., Ng, E.Y.X., Tang, Q., Allport, G.A., Jansen, J.J.F.J., Tomkovich, P.S., Rheindt, F.E. (2019). Population genomics of two congeneric Palaearctic shorebirds reveals differential impacts of Quaternary climate oscillations across habitats types. Scientific Reports 9 (1) : 18172. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-54715-9
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Intracontinental biotic divisions across the vast Palaearctic region are not well-characterized. Past research has revealed patterns ranging from a lack of population structure to deep divergences along varied lines of separation. Here we compared biogeographic patterns of two Palaearctic shorebirds with different habitat preferences, Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus) and Eurasian curlew (N. arquata). Using genome-wide markers from populations across the Palaearctic, we applied a multitude of population genomic and phylogenomic approaches to elucidate population structure. Most importantly, we tested for isolation by distance and visualized barriers and corridors to gene flow. We found shallow Palaearctic population structure in subpolar bog and tundra-breeding whimbrels, consistent with other species breeding at a similarly high latitude, indicating connectivity across the tundra belt, both presently and during southward shifts in periods of global cooling. In contrast, the temperate grassland-breeding Eurasian curlew emerged in three distinct clades corresponding to glacial refugia. Barriers to gene flow coincided with areas of topographic relief in the central Palaearctic for whimbrels and further east for Eurasian curlews. Our findings highlight the interplay of historic and ecological factors in influencing present-day population structure of Palaearctic biota. © 2019, The Author(s).
Source Title: Scientific Reports
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/212226
ISSN: 20452322
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-54715-9
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications
Elements

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
10_1038_s41598-019-54715-9.pdf1.78 MBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons