Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/210233
Title: ANALYSING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN WORKPLACE WELLNESS AND PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT
Authors: GWEE ZI QIAN CHLOE
Keywords: Workplace Design
Workplace Strategy
Activity Based Working
Smart FM
Technology
Workplace Wellness
Wellbeing
User-Centric Technologies
Issue Date: 22-Nov-2021
Citation: GWEE ZI QIAN CHLOE (2021-11-22). ANALYSING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN WORKPLACE WELLNESS AND PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Workplace design is core to an organisation’s values, as well as ways in which people feel and work. With the recent COVID-19 pandemic seeing more companies shifting towards a hybrid working strategy that combines both physical and home working environments, the physical office spaces and workplace designs becomes increasingly important. While there have been tools and efforts to facilitate work in the virtual sphere, some aspects of work such as company culture and collaboration between colleagues cannot easily be substituted with only online spaces (Brookfield, 2020). A vibrant and thoughtful physical space is still key to corporate life. In recent years, there have been more offices adopting approaches that prioritise flexibility over traditional means of work environment whereby employees can freely choose their working environment for the day depending on their schedule and moods (such as Activity Based Working). However, very few studies show how user-centric technologies that occupants interact with daily can help enhance their wellbeing. Hence, the purpose of this study is to identify how occupants perceive user-centric technologies and explore if there exists a link to their wellbeing. Both quantitative and qualitative approaches were utilised by means of interviews with industry experts and data collection through a survey questionnaire. A thorough analysis has been done to better understand the perception of the occupants to see if there is a relationship between workplace wellness and the user-centric technology they interact with daily. However, some limitations such as the lack of responses due to the pandemic were faced. Lastly, the paper suggests future smart technologies that can be adopted in Singapore’s workplaces with hope to provide fresh insights to future possibilities of building smarter and kinder user-centric offices.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/210233
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
Gwee Zi Qian Chloe DBE.pdf18.91 MBAdobe PDF

RESTRICTED

NoneLog In

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.