Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gsf.2017.10.007
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dc.titleRock-soil slope stability analysis by two-phase random media and finite elements
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Y.
dc.contributor.authorXiao, H.
dc.contributor.authorYao, K.
dc.contributor.authorHu, J.
dc.contributor.authorWei, H.
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-09T04:59:49Z
dc.date.available2021-12-09T04:59:49Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationLiu, Y., Xiao, H., Yao, K., Hu, J., Wei, H. (2018). Rock-soil slope stability analysis by two-phase random media and finite elements. Geoscience Frontiers 9 (6) : 1649-1655. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gsf.2017.10.007
dc.identifier.issn1674-9871
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/210086
dc.description.abstractTo investigate the strong random nature of the geometric interfaces between soil and rock, a rock-soil slope is considered as a two-phase random medium. A nonlinear translation of a Gaussian field is utilized to simulate the two-phase random media, such that the soil (or rock) volume fraction and the inclination of the soil layer can be examined. The finite element method with random media incorporated as the material properties is used to determine the factor of safety of the rock-soil slope. Monte-Carlo simulations are used to estimate the statistical characteristics of the factor of safety. The failure mode of the rock-soil slope is examined by observing the maximum principal plastic strain at incipient slope failure. It is found that the critical surface of a rock-soil slope is fairly irregular, and it significantly differs from that of a pure soil slope. The factor of safety is sensitive to the soil volume faction, but it is predictable. The average factor of safety could be well predicted by the weighted harmonic average between the strength of soil and rock; the prediction model is practical and simple. Parametric studies on the inclination of the soil layer demonstrate that the most instable scenario occurs when the slope angle is consistent with the inclination of the soil layer. © 2017 China University of Geosciences (Beijing) and Peking University
dc.publisherElsevier B.V.
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.sourceScopus OA2018
dc.subjectFinite-element modelling
dc.subjectMonte-Carlo simulations
dc.subjectNumerical computation
dc.subjectRandom fields
dc.subjectSlopes stability
dc.subjectStatistical analysis
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF CIVIL & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGG
dc.description.doi10.1016/j.gsf.2017.10.007
dc.description.sourcetitleGeoscience Frontiers
dc.description.volume9
dc.description.issue6
dc.description.page1649-1655
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