Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.redox.2019.101174
DC FieldValue
dc.titleTargeting immune cells for cancer therapy
dc.contributor.authorGun, S.Y.
dc.contributor.authorLee, S.W.L.
dc.contributor.authorSieow, J.L.
dc.contributor.authorWong, S.C.
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-09T03:03:29Z
dc.date.available2021-12-09T03:03:29Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationGun, S.Y., Lee, S.W.L., Sieow, J.L., Wong, S.C. (2019). Targeting immune cells for cancer therapy. Redox Biology 25 : 101174. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.redox.2019.101174
dc.identifier.issn2213-2317
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/209959
dc.description.abstractRecent years have seen a renaissance in the research linking inflammation and cancer with immune cells playing a central role in smouldering inflammation in the tumor microenvironment. Diverse immune cell types infiltrate the tumor microenvironment, and the dynamic tumor-immune cell interplay gives rise to a rich milieu of cytokines and growth factors. Fundamentally, this intricate cross-talk creates the conducive condition for tumor cell proliferation, survival and metastasis. Interestingly, the prominent impact of immune cells is expounded in their contrary pro-tumoral role, as well as their potential anti-cancer cellular weaponry. The latter is known as immunotherapy, a concept born out of evidence that tumors are susceptible to immune defence and that by manipulating the immune system, tumor growth can be successfully restrained. Naturally, a deeper understanding of the multifaceted roles of various immune cell types thus contributes toward developing innovative anti-cancer strategies. Therefore, in this review we first outline the roles played by the major immune cell types, such as macrophages, neutrophils, natural killer cells, T cells and B cells. We then explain the recently-explored strategies of immunomodulation and discuss some important approaches via an immunology perspective. © 2019 The Authors
dc.publisherElsevier B.V.
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.sourceScopus OA2019
dc.subjectCancer
dc.subjectImmune checkpoint
dc.subjectImmunotherapy
dc.subjectInflammation
dc.subjectNanoparticles
dc.typeReview
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF PAEDIATRICS
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF MICROBIOLOGY & IMMUNOLOGY
dc.description.doi10.1016/j.redox.2019.101174
dc.description.sourcetitleRedox Biology
dc.description.volume25
dc.description.page101174
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