Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2019-033855
Title: Effect of a web drama video series on HIV and other sexually transmitted infection testing among gay, bisexual and queer men: study protocol for a community-based, pragmatic randomised controlled trial in Singapore: The People like Us (PLU) Evaluation Study
Authors: Tan, R.K.J. 
Koh, W.L. 
Le, D.
Tan, A.
Tyler, A.
Tan, C.
Banerjee, S.
Wong, C.S. 
Wong, M.-L.
Chio, M.T.-W.
Chen, M.I.-C. 
Keywords: epidemiology
HIV & AIDS
infectious diseases
public health
social medicine
Issue Date: 2020
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
Citation: Tan, R.K.J., Koh, W.L., Le, D., Tan, A., Tyler, A., Tan, C., Banerjee, S., Wong, C.S., Wong, M.-L., Chio, M.T.-W., Chen, M.I.-C. (2020). Effect of a web drama video series on HIV and other sexually transmitted infection testing among gay, bisexual and queer men: study protocol for a community-based, pragmatic randomised controlled trial in Singapore: The People like Us (PLU) Evaluation Study. BMJ Open 10 (4) : e033855. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2019-033855
Rights: Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
Abstract: Introduction Gay, bisexual and queer (GBQ) men are at disproportionately higher risk of acquiring HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). While HIV/STI testing rates among GBQ men are increasing worldwide, they remain suboptimal in a variety of settings. Methods and analysis The study is a pragmatic randomised controlled trial designed to evaluate an online video series developed by a community-based organisation in Singapore for GBQ men. A total of 300 HIV-negative GBQ men in Singapore aged 18-29 years old will be recruited for this study. Participants will subsequently be randomised into the intervention arm (n=150) and the control arm (n=150). The intervention arm (n=150) will be assigned the intervention along with sexual health information via a pamphlet, while the control group (n=150) will be assigned only the sexual health information via a pamphlet. Participants should also not have watched the video prior to their participation in this study, which will be ascertained through a questionnaire. Primary outcomes for this evaluation are changes in self-reported intention to test for, actual testing for and regularity of testing for HIV, syphilis, chlamydia and gonorrhoea at the 3 and 6 months after intervention. Secondary outcomes include changes in self-reported risk perception for HIV and other STIs, knowledge of HIV, knowledge of risks associated with acquiring STIs, knowledge of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis, consistent condom use for anal sex with casual partners, incidence of STIs, connectedness to the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community, self-concealment of sexual orientation, perceived homophobia, internalised homophobia, HIV testing self-efficacy and HIV testing social norms. Ethics and dissemination The study has been approved by the National University of Singapore Institutional Review Board (S-19-059) and registered at ClinicalTrials.gov. The results will be published in peer-reviewed academic journals and disseminated to community-based organisations and policymakers. Trial registration number NCT04021953 © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2020. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.
Source Title: BMJ Open
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/199213
ISSN: 2044-6055
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-033855
Rights: Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
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