Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/190715
DC FieldValue
dc.titleQUALITY OF LIFE OF EXPATRIATES IN RELATION TO THE ACCOMMODATION NEEDS IN SINGAPORE
dc.contributor.authorCHIA CHEE MENG
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-04T10:37:23Z
dc.date.available2021-05-04T10:37:23Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.citationCHIA CHEE MENG (2001). QUALITY OF LIFE OF EXPATRIATES IN RELATION TO THE ACCOMMODATION NEEDS IN SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/190715
dc.description.abstractAim of research is to access the quality of life of expatriates in relation to their accommodation needs. This dissertation has examined the aspects that are most likely to affect the expatriates accommodation selection, their overall accommodation satisfaction with their present dwelling, the demographic, socio-economic characteristics and housing situation of expatriates that are likely to influence their satisfaction and lastly the aspects of accommodation that are most important to the different type of householders namely private apartments/condominiums, landed properties and HDB flats. The analysis shows that both types of expatriate have different preferences, expectations and levels of satisfaction with regard to their accommodation needs. All expatriates, has ranked the following 6 aspects of accommodation in order of importance, adequacy of shopping facilities, proximity to shopping facilities, proximity to local transport and infrastructure, housing condition, public safety and physical environment. For all expatriates, they are currently dissatisfied with the following: availability of international schools, open-patio/garden yard, cost of housing, design and layout, proximity to leisure and recreation, proximity to shopping facilities. The one-way ANOVA is used to identify the socio-economic, demographic characteristics and present housing situation that significantly influence the expatriate's perception of their quality of life in relation to their accommodation needs. Asian expatriates that have more than one child, with higher gross monthly household incomes, living in private housing and staying in the east or central area, were generally more satisfied. Non-Asians with higher gross monthly income, living in private housing and staying in the east or central area were generally more satisfied.
dc.sourceSDE BATCHLOAD 20210507
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.departmentSCHOOL OF DESIGN AND ENVIRONMENT
dc.description.degreeBachelor's
dc.description.degreeconferredBACHELOR OF SCIENCE (REAL ESTATE)
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

Show simple item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
QuChia.pdf52.39 MBAdobe PDF

RESTRICTED

NoneLog In

Page view(s)

23
checked on Feb 2, 2023

Download(s)

1
checked on Feb 2, 2023

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.