Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13059-015-0643-z
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dc.titleEvolutionary dynamics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus within a healthcare system
dc.contributor.authorHsu, L.-Y
dc.contributor.authorHarris, S.R
dc.contributor.authorChlebowicz, M.A
dc.contributor.authorLindsay, J.A
dc.contributor.authorKoh, T.-H
dc.contributor.authorKrishnan, P
dc.contributor.authorTan, T.-Y
dc.contributor.authorHon, P.-Y
dc.contributor.authorGrubb, W.B
dc.contributor.authorBentley, S.D
dc.contributor.authorParkhill, J
dc.contributor.authorPeacock, S.J
dc.contributor.authorHolden, M.T.G
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-19T09:45:46Z
dc.date.available2020-11-19T09:45:46Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationHsu, L.-Y, Harris, S.R, Chlebowicz, M.A, Lindsay, J.A, Koh, T.-H, Krishnan, P, Tan, T.-Y, Hon, P.-Y, Grubb, W.B, Bentley, S.D, Parkhill, J, Peacock, S.J, Holden, M.T.G (2015). Evolutionary dynamics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus within a healthcare system. Genome Biology 16 (1) : 81. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13059-015-0643-z
dc.identifier.issn14747596
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/183763
dc.description.abstractBackground: In the past decade, several countries have seen gradual replacement of endemic multi-resistant healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with clones that are more susceptible to antibiotic treatment. One example is Singapore, where MRSA ST239, the dominant clone since molecular profiling of MRSA began in the mid-1980s, has been replaced by ST22 isolates belonging to EMRSA-15, a recently emerged pandemic lineage originating from Europe. Results: We investigated the population structure of MRSA in Singaporean hospitals spanning three decades, using whole genome sequencing. Applying Bayesian phylogenetic methods we report that prior to the introduction of ST22, the ST239 MRSA population in Singapore originated from multiple introductions from the surrounding region; it was frequently transferred within the healthcare system resulting in a heterogeneous hospital population. Following the introduction of ST22 around the beginning of the millennium, this clone spread rapidly through Singaporean hospitals, supplanting the endemic ST239 population. Coalescent analysis revealed that although the genetic diversity of ST239 initially decreased as ST22 became more dominant, from 2007 onwards the genetic diversity of ST239 began to increase once more, which was not associated with the emergence of a sub-clone of ST239. Comparative genomic analysis of the accessory genome of the extant ST239 population identified that the Arginine Catabolic Mobile Element arose multiple times, thereby introducing genes associated with enhanced skin colonization into this population. Conclusions: Our results clearly demonstrate that, alongside clinical practice and antibiotic usage, competition between clones also has an important role in driving the evolution of nosocomial pathogen populations. @ 2015 Hsu et al.; licensee BioMed Central.
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceUnpaywall 20201031
dc.subjectclindamycin
dc.subjectcotrimoxazole
dc.subjecterythromycin
dc.subjectgentamicin
dc.subjectquinoline derived antiinfective agent
dc.subjecttetracycline
dc.subjectbacterial DNA
dc.subjectantibiotic resistance
dc.subjectantibiotic sensitivity
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subjectbacterial colonization
dc.subjectbacterial transmission
dc.subjectcontrolled study
dc.subjectevolutionary homology
dc.subjectgene sequence
dc.subjectgenetic association
dc.subjectgenetic variability
dc.subjecthealth care system
dc.subjectincidence
dc.subjectmethicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus
dc.subjectnonhuman
dc.subjectphylogenetic tree
dc.subjectphylogeny
dc.subjectpopulation structure
dc.subjectprevalence
dc.subjectSingapore
dc.subjectsingle nucleotide polymorphism
dc.subjectspecies dominance
dc.subjectbacterial genome
dc.subjectBayes theorem
dc.subjectcross infection
dc.subjectDNA sequence
dc.subjectgene library
dc.subjectgene locus
dc.subjectgenetics
dc.subjecthospital
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectisolation and purification
dc.subjectmethicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus
dc.subjectmicrobiology
dc.subjectmolecular cloning
dc.subjectmolecular evolution
dc.subjectphylogeography
dc.subjectpopulation genetics
dc.subjectmethicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus
dc.subjectBayes Theorem
dc.subjectCloning, Molecular
dc.subjectCross Infection
dc.subjectDNA, Bacterial
dc.subjectEvolution, Molecular
dc.subjectGene Library
dc.subjectGenetic Loci
dc.subjectGenetics, Population
dc.subjectGenome, Bacterial
dc.subjectHospitals
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMethicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
dc.subjectPhylogeny
dc.subjectPhylogeography
dc.subjectSequence Analysis, DNA
dc.subjectSingapore
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentSAW SWEE HOCK SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
dc.contributor.departmentDUKE-NUS MEDICAL SCHOOL
dc.description.doi10.1186/s13059-015-0643-z
dc.description.sourcetitleGenome Biology
dc.description.volume16
dc.description.issue1
dc.description.page81
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