Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2014.00108
Title: The feedback-related negativity reflects "more or less" prediction error in appetitive and aversive conditions
Authors: Huang, Y
Yu, R 
Keywords: adult
appetite
article
association
aversive behavior
electroencephalography
event related potential
feedback related negativity
feedback system
female
human
male
normal human
prediction
reward
task performance
Issue Date: 2014
Citation: Huang, Y, Yu, R (2014). The feedback-related negativity reflects "more or less" prediction error in appetitive and aversive conditions. Frontiers in Neuroscience (43593) : 108. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2014.00108
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Humans make predictions and use feedback to update their subsequent predictions. The feedback-related negativity (FRN) has been found to be sensitive to negative feedback as well as negative prediction error, such that the FRN is larger for outcomes that are worse than expected. The present study examined prediction errors in both appetitive and aversive conditions. We found that the FRN was more negative for reward omission vs. wins and for loss omission vs. losses, suggesting that the FRN might classify outcomes in a "more-or-less than expected" fashion rather than in the "better-or-worse than expected" dimension. Our findings challenge the previous notion that the FRN only encodes negative feedback and "worse than expected" negative prediction error. © 2014 Huang and Yu.
Source Title: Frontiers in Neuroscience
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/183710
ISSN: 16624548
DOI: 10.3389/fnins.2014.00108
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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