Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1186/s40246-017-0116-4
Title: Falling giants and the rise of gene editing: Ethics, private interests and the public good Ruth Chadwick
Authors: Capps, B
Chadwick, R
Joly, Y
Mulvihill, J.J
Lysaght, T 
Zwart, H
Keywords: biobank
clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat
ethics
gene editing
genomics
human
human genome project
market
narrative
profit
scientist
shoulder
tension
gene editing
interpersonal communication
medical genetics
medical research
procedures
public opinion
Biomedical Research
Communication
Gene Editing
Genetics, Medical
Genomics
Humans
Public Opinion
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: Henry Stewart Publications
Citation: Capps, B, Chadwick, R, Joly, Y, Mulvihill, J.J, Lysaght, T, Zwart, H (2017). Falling giants and the rise of gene editing: Ethics, private interests and the public good Ruth Chadwick. Human Genomics 11 (1) : 20. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40246-017-0116-4
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: This paper considers the tensions created in genomic research by public and private for-profit ideals. Our intent is to strengthen the public good at a time when doing science is strongly motivated by market possibilities and opportunities. Focusing on the emergence of gene editing, and in particular CRISPR, we consider how commercialisation encourages hype and hope - a sense that only promise and idealism can achieve progress. At this rate, genomic research reinforces structures that promote, above all else, private interests, but that may attenuate conditions for the public good of science. In the first part, we situate genomics using the aphorism that 'on the shoulders of giants we see farther'; these giants are infrastructures and research cultures rather than individual 'heroes' of science. In this respect, private initiatives are not the only pivot for successful discovery, and indeed, fascination in those could impinge upon the fundamental role of public-supported discovery. To redress these circumstances, we define the extent to which progress presupposes research strategies that are for the public good. In the second part, we use a 'falling giant' narrative to illustrate the risks of over-indulging for-profit initiatives. We therefore offer a counterpoint to commercialised science, using three identifiable 'giants' - scientists, publics and cultures - to illustrate how the public good contributes to genomic discovery. © 2017 The Author(s).
Source Title: Human Genomics
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/183543
ISSN: 1473-9542
DOI: 10.1186/s40246-017-0116-4
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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