Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.4103/2152-7806.163819
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dc.titleSerum procalcitonin is a marker for prediction of readmission from an intermediate care to an acute care hospital in neurosurgical patients
dc.contributor.authorLim, J.X
dc.contributor.authorKing, N
dc.contributor.authorLow, S
dc.contributor.authorNg, W.H
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T02:53:11Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T02:53:11Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationLim, J.X, King, N, Low, S, Ng, W.H (2015). Serum procalcitonin is a marker for prediction of readmission from an intermediate care to an acute care hospital in neurosurgical patients. Surgical Neurology International 6 (1) : 163819. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.4103/2152-7806.163819
dc.identifier.issn21527806
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/183457
dc.description.abstractBackground: Readmission of patients to acute hospitals contributes significantly toward inefficient utilization of healthcare resources, with studies quoting up to 90% being preventable. We aim to report and analyze the factors involved in the readmission of neurosurgical patients who had been previously transferred to an intermediate step-down care facility, and explore possible predictive markers for such readmissions. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of all 129 neurosurgical patients who were transferred from out acute tertiary hospital to an intermediate care facility. The cases were segregated into those who were readmitted and those who were not readmitted back to our acute center. The demographic data, clinical features, diagnoses, treatment modalities, pretransfer laboratory findings, and inpatient complications were compared with readmission rate. Results: There were 23 patients (17.8%) who were readmitted to our acute hospital. The most common causes of readmission was infection (n = 12, 52.2%). We found a statistically significant correlation between the higher pretransfer procalcitonin levels with the readmission of our patients (P = 0.037). There was also a significant difference noted between ethnic groups (P = 0.026) and having no complications of disease or treatment (P = 0.008), with readmission. Conclusion: Procalcitonin is a pro-hormone known to correlate with infection and poor neurological status. We have found that its serum values correlate significantly with the readmission rates of neurosurgical patients in our study. We postulate that by ensuring normality in procalcitonin levels prior to transfer to an intermediate care facility, potentially half of neurosurgical readmissions can be prevented. © 2015 Surgical Neurology International | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow.
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceUnpaywall 20201031
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentDUKE-NUS MEDICAL SCHOOL
dc.description.doi10.4103/2152-7806.163819
dc.description.sourcetitleSurgical Neurology International
dc.description.volume6
dc.description.issue1
dc.description.page163819
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