Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1038/srep26339
Title: Decellularization of human stromal refractive lenticules for corneal tissue engineering
Authors: Yam, G.H.-F 
Yusoff, N.Z.B.M
Goh, T.-W
Setiawan, M
Lee, X.-W
Liu, Y.-C 
Mehta, J.S 
Keywords: dodecyl sulfate sodium
allotransplantation
animal
chemistry
cornea
cornea stroma
cornea transplantation
cytology
disease model
drug effects
human
Leporidae
photorefractive keratectomy
procedures
surgery
tissue engineering
transplantation
Animals
Cornea
Corneal Stroma
Corneal Surgery, Laser
Corneal Transplantation
Disease Models, Animal
Humans
Rabbits
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate
Tissue and Organ Harvesting
Tissue Engineering
Transplantation, Homologous
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Citation: Yam, G.H.-F, Yusoff, N.Z.B.M, Goh, T.-W, Setiawan, M, Lee, X.-W, Liu, Y.-C, Mehta, J.S (2016). Decellularization of human stromal refractive lenticules for corneal tissue engineering. Scientific Reports 6 : 26339. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep26339
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) becomes a procedure to correct myopia. The extracted lenticule can be used for other clinical scenarios. To prepare for allogeneic implantation, lenticule decellularization with preserved optical property, stromal architecture and chemistry would be necessary. We evaluated different methods to decellularize thin human corneal stromal lenticules created by femtosecond laser. Treatment with 0.1% sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) followed by extensive washes was the most efficient protocol to remove cellular and nuclear materials. Empty cell space was found inside the stroma, which displayed aligned collagen fibril architecture similar to native stroma. The SDS-based method was superior to other treatments with hyperosmotic 1.5 M sodium chloride, 0.1% Triton X-100 and nucleases (from 2 to 10 U/ml DNase and RNase) in preserving extracellular matrix content (collagens, glycoproteins and glycosaminoglycans). The stromal transparency and light transmittance was indifferent to untreated lenticules. In vitro recellularization showed that the SDS-treated lenticules supported corneal stromal fibroblast growth. In vivo re-implantation into a rabbit stromal pocket further revealed the safety and biocompatibility of SDS-decellularized lenticules without short- and long-term rejection risk. Our results concluded that femtosecond laser-derived human stromal lenticules decellularized by 0.1% SDS could generate a transplantable bioscaffold with native-like stromal architecture and chemistry.
Source Title: Scientific Reports
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/182470
ISSN: 2045-2322
DOI: 10.1038/srep26339
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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