Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1186/1475-925X-10-52
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dc.titleTowards patient-specific cardiovascular modeling system using the immersed boundary technique
dc.contributor.authorTay, W.-B
dc.contributor.authorTseng, Y.-H
dc.contributor.authorLin, L.-Y
dc.contributor.authorTseng, W.-Y
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-27T11:32:17Z
dc.date.available2020-10-27T11:32:17Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationTay, W.-B, Tseng, Y.-H, Lin, L.-Y, Tseng, W.-Y (2011). Towards patient-specific cardiovascular modeling system using the immersed boundary technique. BioMedical Engineering Online 10 (1) : 52. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1186/1475-925X-10-52
dc.identifier.issn1475925X
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/181633
dc.description.abstractBackground: Previous research shows that the flow dynamics in the left ventricle (LV) reveal important information about cardiac health. This information can be used in early diagnosis of patients with potential heart problems. The current study introduces a patient-specific cardiovascular-modelling system (CMS) which simulates the flow dynamics in the LV to facilitate physicians in early diagnosis of patients before heart failure. Methods: The proposed system will identify possible disease conditions and facilitates early diagnosis through hybrid computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation and time-resolved magnetic resonance imaging (4-D MRI). The simulation is based on the 3-D heart model, which can simultaneously compute fluid and elastic boundary motions using the immersed boundary method. At this preliminary stage, the 4-D MRI is used to provide an appropriate comparison. This allows flexible investigation of the flow features in the ventricles and their responses. Results: The results simulate various flow rates and kinetic energy in the diastole and systole phases, demonstrating the feasibility of capturing some of the important characteristics of the heart during different phases. However, some discrepancies exist in the pulmonary vein and aorta flow rate between the numerical and experimental data. Further studies are essential to investigate and solve the remaining problems before using the data in clinical diagnostics. Conclusions: The results show that by using a simple reservoir pressure boundary condition (RPBC), we are able to capture some essential variations found in the clinical data. Our approach establishes a first-step framework of a practical patient-specific CMS, which comprises a 3-D CFD model (without involving actual hemodynamic data yet) to simulate the heart and the 4-D PC-MRI system. At this stage, the 4-D PC-MRI system is used for verification purpose rather than input. This brings us closer to our goal of developing a practical patient-specific CMS, which will be pursued next. We anticipate that in the future, this hybrid system can potentially identify possible disease conditions in LV through comprehensive analysis and facilitates physicians in early diagnosis of probable cardiac problems. © 2011 Tay et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceUnpaywall 20201031
dc.subjectCardiovascular models
dc.subjectImmersed boundary technique
dc.subjectPatient specific
dc.subjectCardiac health
dc.subjectCFD models
dc.subjectClinical data
dc.subjectComprehensive analysis
dc.subjectEarly diagnosis
dc.subjectElastic boundary
dc.subjectExperimental data
dc.subjectFlow dynamics
dc.subjectFlow features
dc.subjectHeart model
dc.subjectHybrid computational
dc.subjectImmersed boundary methods
dc.subjectImmersed boundary technique
dc.subjectLeft ventricles
dc.subjectModeling systems
dc.subjectPulmonary veins
dc.subjectReservoir pressures
dc.subjectTime-resolved
dc.subjectDiagnosis
dc.subjectFlow rate
dc.subjectHeart
dc.subjectHybrid systems
dc.subjectMagnetic resonance imaging
dc.subjectResonance
dc.subjectThree dimensional
dc.subjectTurbulent flow
dc.subjectComputational fluid dynamics
dc.subjectadult
dc.subjectarticle
dc.subjectbiological model
dc.subjectblood flow velocity
dc.subjectcardiovascular system
dc.subjectcomparative study
dc.subjectcomputer assisted diagnosis
dc.subjectcomputer simulation
dc.subjectevaluation
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjectheart disease
dc.subjectheart ventricle
dc.subjecthemodynamics
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjecthydrodynamics
dc.subjectkinetics
dc.subjectmetabolism
dc.subjectmethodology
dc.subjectnuclear magnetic resonance imaging
dc.subjectphysiology
dc.subjectpressure
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectBlood Flow Velocity
dc.subjectCardiovascular System
dc.subjectComputer Simulation
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHeart Diseases
dc.subjectHeart Ventricles
dc.subjectHemodynamics
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectHydrodynamics
dc.subjectImage Interpretation, Computer-Assisted
dc.subjectKinetics
dc.subjectMagnetic Resonance Imaging
dc.subjectModels, Cardiovascular
dc.subjectPressure
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentTEMASEK LABORATORIES
dc.description.doi10.1186/1475-925X-10-52
dc.description.sourcetitleBioMedical Engineering Online
dc.description.volume10
dc.description.issue1
dc.description.page52
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